North Korea Is Not Happy About the Release of The Interview

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June 30, 2014 - Pyongyang, North Korea: Top leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea Kim Jong Un poses for a photo as he oversees a tactical rocket firing drill of the DPRK military. The DPRK has launched precision guided missiles and fired shells with dispersion effect for striking both individual and group targets of the enemy in the drill. (Xinhua/Polaris) ///
Photo: Xinhua/Polaris

Regardless of whether North Korea was actually behind the Sony hack, the government of Kim Jong-un was not happy to see The Interview make it onto (a limited number of) big and small screens. On Saturday, North Korea’s powerful National Defense Commission attacked President Obama for encouraging Sony to release the movie despite terror threats from the hackers. “Obama always goes reckless in words and deeds like a monkey in a tropical forest,” said a statement, which complained that the Seth Rogen–James Franco joint undermined “the dignity of the supreme leadership.”

The statement also once again denied that North Korea carried out the cyberattack on Sony and blamed the United States for the widespread internet outage that hit the dictatorship last week: “The United States, with its large physical size and oblivious to the shame of playing hide and seek as children with runny noses would, has begun disrupting the Internet operations of the main media outlets of our republic.” The White House, which has declined to say if it was responsible for taking North Korea offline, has yet to respond to North Korea’s accusations and racist insult, but the ongoing tension can only mean good things for The Interview’s earning potential.