Clinton Foundation Born After Bill Clinton Realized Not Being President Was Super Boring

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WASHINGTON, :  US President Bill Clinton looks at the computer screen as he participates in the Democratic Leadership Council/Excite On Line Town Hall Meeting late 08 November 1999 at the Marvin Center Auditorium at George Washington University. The town hall meeting was conducted over the internet.  (ELECTRONIC IMAGE)     AFP Photo by Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Is this it?Photo: PAUL J. RICHARDS

In the beginning of it all,” the Washington Post notes in its story on the birth of the Clinton Foundation, “Bill Clinton was feeling unfulfilled.”

His presidency had just ended, and he was in Chappaqua all alone. His golf buddy Steven Spielberg gave him a TiVo, and Clinton “holed up for hours watching movies and the TV shows he had missed while he was president, several friends recalled.”

At a certain point, ‘90s television was no longer enough. Clinton got bored. Since Breaking Bad didn’t exist yet, he needed to find something else to do. Hanging out with celebrities and raising money for charities seemed like a good idea. 

Friends,” the Post says, “saw Clinton — the lost, lonely, TiVo-bingeing ex-president — transformed into a champion of Harlem and an international philanthropist.” 

The moral of this story is that you should keep binge-watching Orange Is the New Black and The West Wing because at some point, your dreams will come true — but only if you also happen to know Brad Pitt and Bono.