North Korea Would Like to Unsubscribe From All Nuclear-Talk Updates

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North Korean leader Kim Jong Un visits the Songdowon International Children's Camp, as its remodelling project nears completion, in this undated photo released by North Korea's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) April 21, 2014. REUTERS/KCNA (NORTH KOREA - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY) ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. REUTERS IS UNABLE TO INDEPENDENTLY VERIFY THE AUTHENTICITY, CONTENT, LOCATION OR DATE OF THIS IMAGE. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS. NO THIRD PARTY SALES. NOT FOR USE BY REUTERS THIRD PARTY DISTRIBUTORS. SOUTH KOREA OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN SOUTH KOREA - RTR3M2A4
Photo: KCNA / Reuters

North Korea would like you to know that it would not like to talk about getting rid of any nuclear weapons it might have, in case anyone was wondering. The isolated country’s foreign ministry sent out a statement today, marking its first official reaction to the completed negotiations in Iran. “It is not logical to compare our situation with the Iranian nuclear agreement,” the statement notes, “because we are always subjected to provocative U.S. military hostilities, including massive joint military exercises and a grave nuclear threat.” 

We are clearly a nuclear power and nuclear powers have their own interests,” the statement adds.

Secretary of State John Kerry has tried to reach out to North Korea — with the help of South Korea, China, Japan, and Russia — to talk about maybe disarming. The country has mostly responded with the silent treatment.

North Korea, which faces crippling sanctions from much of the world, is reportedly in the middle of a major drought that has many wondering whether the country will apply for foreign aid this year. The loosening of sanctions was one of the main reasons Iran decided to negotiate with the U.S. and other countries. However, it seems unlikely that North Korea will install a leader more willing to talk to the world outside anytime soon. On Sunday, 100 percent of voters said that Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un should stay in charge. A reported 99.97 percent of citizens cast a ballot, the same exact percentage that did in 2011.