Scenes of Irma’s Path of Destruction, From the Caribbean to Florida

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A roof from a nearby building is seen against a funeral home on Marco Island, where Irma made a second landfall in Florida. Photo: The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Irma is now a post-tropical cyclone, ragged and weakened after ravaging the Caribbean and tearing through Florida. Few parts of the peninsula were spared the hurricane’s enormous reach — though many places escaped the worst-case scenario. Cities like Tampa, which braced for the catastrophe, got a “glancing blow,” while the Florida Keys — where Irma made landfall as a powerful Category 4 — are utterly devastated.

The storm killed at least 11 people in Florida and Georgia. The death toll in the Caribbean and Cuba is currently as high as 37. And Irma, coming right on the heels of Harvey, will likely require billions in recovery and rebuilding aid. But right now in Florida, residents and officials are surveying the damage as evacuees make their way back to their homes and businesses. More than 15 million people in Florida alone are without power. Officials said it could take weeks to restore electricity. Neighborhoods across the state are dotted with downed trees and debris, and streets in places such as Jacksonville and Naples are still flooded out.

The Florida Keys are ground zero for Irma’s wrath. FEMA officials estimated that 25 percent of homes were completely destroyed, while another 65 percent suffered serious damage. “My heart goes out to the people in the Keys,” Florida governor Rick Scott said, who surveyed the scene from the air on Monday. “There’s devastation. I just hope everybody survived. It’s horrible what we saw.”

Damaged houseboats are shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on September 11, 2017, in Key West, Florida. Photo: Pool/Getty Images
Damaged sailboats are shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on September 11, 2017, in Key West, Florida. (Photo by Matt McClain -Pool/Getty Images) Photo: Pool/Getty Images

Some areas are still flooded in Naples, in southwestern Florida. Mayor Bill Barnett said, despite the destruction, the city “dodged” the dire storm-surge predictions of 12 to 18 feet. Mobile-home communities in East Naples were among the hardest hit.

Flooded homes stand in a rural part of Naples the day after Hurricane Irma swept through the area on September 11, 2017, in Naples, Florida. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images
The Sunrise Motel remains flooded after Hurricane Irma hit the area on September 11, 2017, in East Naples, Florida. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Jacksonville, Florida, is about 400 miles from where Irma first made landfall, in the northeastern corner of the state. But it was battered by the tropical storm, with storm-surge flooding from the St. Johns River that broke the record set in 1964 during Hurricane Dora. Governor Scott is surveying the damage from the air Tuesday.

People in storm-surge flood waters from Hurricane Irma along the St. Johns River at Memorial Park on September 11, 2017, in Jacksonville, Florida. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
Justin Hand navigates storm-surge floodwaters from Hurricane Irma along the St. Johns River on September 11, 2017, in Jacksonville, Florida. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images
A man canoes through the flooded streets of the San Marco historic district of Jacksonville, Florida, on September 11, 2017, after storm surge from Hurricane Irma left the area flooded. Photo: JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Irma tore through Cuba as a Category 5 storm before it reached Florida, killing at least ten people. Parts of Havana were inundated, and wind gusts of up to 130 miles per hour tore roofs off homes.

Cubans wade through a flooded street in Havana, on September 10, 2017. Photo: YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images
View of damages after the passage of Hurricane Irma, in Cojimar neighborhood in Havana, on September 10, 2017. Photo: YAMIL LAGE/AFP/Getty Images

Irma cut a path through the Caribbean that turned Barbuda to “rubble” and razed homes in St. Martin.

Houses are seen on September 8, 2017, in Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda, devastated by Hurricane Irma. Photo: GEMMA HANDY/AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Virgin Islands are facing a potential humanitarian crisis, reports the New York Times. U.S. military helicopters are dropping food and water aid, and nearly 5,000 American troops are headed to the islands to help with relief efforts. On St. John, about 80 percent of homes were destroyed.

A woman with her two children walk past debris left by Hurricane Irma in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Sunday, Septermber 10, 2017. Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AP
Scenes From Irma’s Path of Destruction