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This Year's Hot Stove Analysis Includes Searching for Clues in Jose Reyes's Song Lyrics

Jose Reyes.

Kevin Kernan has a column in the Post today entitled "Rap song reveals Reyes' free-agent feelings." The column makes the case that the Marlins would be a good landing spot for Reyes, but in the process of making that case, Kernan turns to the lyrics of "No Hay Amigo," a song released this summer in which Reyes does some rapping. Writes Kernan: "So, what’s in a rap song? Perhaps, the key to Jose Reyes’ free agent future." Hot stove 2011, everybody.

From the Post:

In his song and video “No Hay Amigo’’ that was released in July, Reyes sings the following powerful words:

“There are no friends. A friend is a dollar in my pocket. As soon as you turn your back your friends want to stab you in the back. A real friend is a glass full of water in the desert to quench your thirst ... Where were you when I used to practice without any food to eat or when I used to spend a week with the same T-shirt? There are no friends. My friends are my mother and my father, the ones who struggled with me to make me who I am.’’

The Mets are no longer Reyes’ friends. The Mets are financially strapped and seemed to have taken the following approach when it comes to their game plan for getting back into the thick of the NL East race some day: “Let’s wait until the Phillies get old.’’

The Mets cannot quench Reyes’ thirst.

Believe it or not, Mets blogs are skeptical that Reyes's lyrics contain any clues about his free-agent intentions. But have those bloggers even bothered to play the song backwards and hear the hidden anti-Wilpon messages? We bet they haven't! Granted, that's probably because such messages don't actually exist, and that looking for meaning in Reyes's song is a foolish exercize. But still, we bet they haven't!

Anyway, if you're unfamiliar with "No Hay Amigo," or if you're just a big fan of Auto-Tune, here's the song's video.

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Photo: Patrick McDermott/2011 Getty Images