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Every denim-wearing New Yorker knows that one wash, rise, length, or silhouette does not fit all. These days, fortunately, there are flattering jeans for just about every taste and body type—and you no longer have to throw down hundreds to acquire them. At $70, this inky, ultraslim pair from Topshop is worthy of consideration if you happen to be into the whole jeggings subgenre (Moto Leigh Ankle Grazers,478 Broadway, nr. Broome St.; 212-966-9555).

Photo: Danny Kim

High-Rise Cigarettes by BDG
Urban Outfitters’ BDG label confounds the usually constrictive skinny-jeans model: The legs are, indeed, skinny, but the high-rise and spandex cotton allow you to move comfortably ($58; 2633 Broadway, at 99th St.; 212-222-3212).

Photo: Danny Kim

910 Skinny Leg Jeans by J.Brand
Back pockets are smaller and placed higher on the rear, creating an ultraflattering optical illusion. And the semi-stretchy fabric keeps its shape between washes ($158 at Bloomingdale’s, 1000 Third Ave., at 59th St.; 212-705-2000).

Photo: Danny Kim

Men’s 501s by Levi’s
The classic reigns. Based on Levi Strauss’s original design, 501s still have the straight seat and legs and the front-tilting waist that made them the gold standard a hundred years ago ($50; 25 W. 14th St., at Fifth Ave.; 212-242-2128).

Photo: Danny Kim

Men’s UJ Selvedge Jeans by Uniqlo
The Japanese retailer famously does alterations for free, making it a favorite of the inseam-challenged. Plus, the brand’s rainbow of colored-jeans options is unrivaled ($39.90; 546 Broadway, nr. Spring St.; 917-237-8800).

Photo: Danny Kim

Vintage Wash Skinny Jeans by American Eagle
The best rendition of new old-style denim, with a classically slim, not-quite-tapered fit. An authentically vintage pair with the same look would set you back hundreds of dollars, or as many hours digging at the Brooklyn Flea ($79.50; 599 Broadway, at Prince St.; 212-941-9785).

Photo: Danny Kim

Men’s 1969 Slouchy Slim Jeans by Gap
The retail giant buys in serious bulk and can therefore afford to sell premium denim at, well, Gap prices. Their 1969 line, which includes these straight, not-skinny jeans, comes from the same mills in Turkey, Japan, and Italy that supply fabric to premium brands like 7 for all Mankind and Diesel ($59.90; 680 Fifth Ave., at 54th St.; 212-977-7023).

Photo: Danny Kim

Zelda Jeans by Express
A surprisingly good source for hard-to-fit body types, Express makes each style in slim, regular, and curvy cuts. And, for long-legged women, these skinnies (among other pairs) are available in a 33- and 35-inch inseams ($60; 7 W. 34th St., at Fifth Ave.; 212-629-6838).

Photo: Danny Kim

Men’s New Standard Jeans by H&M
Organic denim for dirt cheap, though easily mistakable for a $250 pair. The dropped crotch helps circulation, the just-tapered-enough legs looks current ($39.95, 640 Fifth Ave., at 51st St.; 212-489-0390)

Photo: Danny Kim

Switchyard Cargos by Madewell
J.Crew’s younger—and often cheaper—sister is constantly rolling out up-to-the-second styles with high-end-looking details, like the ankle-zipper on this slim version of the cargo pant. And they don’t fall apart after a few trips through the laundry—hence the name ($110; 486 Broome St., at Broadway; 212-226-6954).

Photo: RTimages/Alamy

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim
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