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Raghunath Cappo, Yogamaya instructor

(135 W. 20th St., nr. Sixth Ave., sixth fl.; 212-675-4555)

“I'm shitty at most things in life— I can’t change a tire or hang a picture. But I know the yoga game. I was a monk for six years and got into yoga for spiritual reasons. This lotus position activates the two lower chakras dealing with relationships, sexuality, stability, and reproduction.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Carolyn Chiu, vertical-yoga instructor at Shockra Studio

(114 E. 28th St., nr. Park Ave., Ste. 2A; 212-696-9642)

“A lot of pole classes are very seductive, but mine is geared toward fitness. With a little work, anyone with a pair of arms and legs can do this basic Pig pose.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Sophie Herbert, instructor at Park Slope Yoga Center

(792 Union St., nr. Seventh Ave., Park Slope; 718-789-2288)

“There’s no such thing as being ‘bad’ at yoga. This reclined version of the leg-behind-head pose called Eka Pada Sirsasana is more fun than anything.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Anya Porter, Breakti-yoga instructor at the Yoga Room

(38-01 35th Ave., nr. 38th St., Astoria; 718-274-0255)

“I started yoga because I injured myself street-dancing and breaking. The Grand Stand helps you get comfortable being upside-down. It’s one of the more spectacular yoga-breaking freezes.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Adam Rinder and Kathryn Ulrich, AcroYoga instructors at OM Factory

(265 W. 37th St., nr. Eighth Ave.; 212-616-8662)

ADAM: “In the partnered version of Natarajasana, the flier just has to squeeze her feet and trust.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Hari Nam Singh Khalsa, Kundalini-yoga instructor at Golden Bridge Yoga

(253 Centre St., nr. Broome St.; 212-343-8191)

“Every time you touch one finger to another, it facilitates a flow of energy. For the Pushma Flower Meditation mudra, you tense your fingers until they’re almost shaking, like a Tiger’s Claw in kung fu.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Megan Hornaday, aerial-yoga instructor at Yoga Sutra NYC

(6 E. 39th St., nr. Madison Ave., second fl.; 212-490-1443)

“There’s nothing more empowering than becoming strong enough to maneuver your body in the air. I can do splits horizontally or vertically; they really put the stretch in your hip and hamstrings.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Jackie Baker, whale-yoga instructor for Next Generation Yoga with David and Mayra Burokas

(866-649-9642)

JACKIE: We do a lot of chanting and singing in whale yoga. If I’m kind of losing the kids’ focus, I’ll just start singing a little ditty: “Come back to your mats, come back to your mats!”

Photo: Danny Kim

Adi Carter, slack-line yoga instructor for Yoga Slackers

(yogaslackers.com)

“You feel the Upavishta Konasana most in your hips because of the straddle on the slack line. But it’s surprisingly sustainable—you can just kind of hang out it in for a while.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Nicole Benisch, hoop-yoga fusion instructor at Do Yoga Do Pilates

(78 Reade St., nr. Church St.; 212-587-1099, doyogadopilates.com)

“The Boat pose requires an immense amount of core strength, which is tricky to achieve without using a prop. The hoop gives you stability.”

Photo: Danny Kim

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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