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Karen Dahlberg, 34

Federal attorney

“The city is a crowded place—even the parks are too crowded for me. I love sitting on my board and feeling like I have the ocean to myself.”

Photo: Bonnie Biess

Todd DiCiurcio, 39 and Megan DiCiurcio, 41

Artist and PR director at Tommy Hilfiger

“The high is better than any drug. And there’s no hangover, only sore muscles. Nothing a good massage can’t cure.”
—Todd

Photo: Courtesy of the Subjects

Mike Bulger, 36

Body-alignment specialist

Photo: Courtesy of the Subject

Scott Rosenstein, 36

Global-health-policy expert

“I’m six-foot-four, not a very good swimmer, so progress is slow and frequently painful—and the A train almost always lets me down. But the challenge and the ocean somehow make it worth it.”

Photo: Bob Arkow

Stefan Cangea, 28

Investment banker

Photo: Michael Rovnyak

Cynthia Rowley, 53

Fashion designer

Photo: Richard Phillips

William Finnegan, 58

Staff writer at The New Yorker

“It’s never felt like a sport. It has no edges. I surfed all three days of Irene—Montauk to Jersey. If you’ve been in it as long as I have, you’re just hardwired to go when there’s swell.”

Photo: Courtesy of the Subject

Mike Asselin, 29

Physician assistant, intensive-care unit

“Surfing keeps me focused on what’s really important, which is just getting good waves. I hear people complain about not knowing what they want to do with their life. I’ve never had that problem, I just want to get good waves.”

Photo: Courtesy of the Subject

Lawrence Luhring, 55

Gallery owner

Photo: Courtesy of the Subject

Julie Gilhart, 53

Fashion consultant

“Surfing means I have more scars: one on my shin where my fin sliced me; one on my forehead where my board hit me; and a chipped tooth that keeps needing to be fixed.”

Photo: Michael Rovnyak

Anthony Michaels, “65-plus”

Attorney and real-estate developer

“I have been advised under penalty of grievous harm not to divulge my special spots.”

Photo: Courtesy of the Subject

Alex Matthiessen, 47

Environmental consultant

“I usually slog to Ditch Plains, competing with drivers for the road and surfers for the waves. But, as in the city, goodwill prevails.”

photo: Blair Seagram

Obi Onyejekwe, 34

Creative director

Photo: Courtesy of the Subject

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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