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Jones Wood Foundry’s crumpets, $7
Instead of tea, you can wash your crumpets down with a Sixpoint ale custom-made for this uptown pub. 401 E. 76th St., nr. First Ave.; 212-249-2700.

Photo: Danny Kim

John Dory Oyster Bar’s parsley-anchovy toast, $4
A bright smack of garlic, chiles, olive oil, and lemon zest—all the hallmarks of April Bloomfield’s bold style on a slice of filone. 1196 Broadway, at 29th St.; 212-792-9000.

Photo: Danny Kim

Tartinery’s labneh tartine with cucumber and olive oil, $9.50
The runway model of toast: translucent cucumber slices on a chic sliver of pain Poilâne, France’s most prestigious bread. 209 Mulberry St., nr. Spring St.; 212-300-5838.

Photo: Danny Kim

David Burke Kitchen’s “jars,” $5 to $7
At the second-floor toast bar, you spread your own. (We recommend the chicken liver with prunes.) 23 Grand St., at Sixth Ave.; 212-201-9119.

Photo: Danny Kim

Fishtag’s baccalà-and-skordalia-brandade “melt,” $9
If your mother was part Greek, part Italian and she went to a cutting-edge culinary school, this is how she might interpret a tuna melt. 222 W. 79th St., nr. Broadway; 212-362-7470.

Photo: Danny Kim

61 Local’s ricotta toast, $6
A paean to products like Salvatore Bklyn ricotta, Andrew’s Local honey, and Scratchbread focaccia. 61 Bergen St., nr. Smith St., Cobble Hill; no phone.

Photo: Danny Kim

Fedora’s smoked-sturgeon-avocado toast, $14
The bread: Sullivan St Bakery filone. The garnish: arugula, pickled shallots, and crème fraîche. The effect: haute “appetizing.” (Late-night menu only.) 239 W. 4th St., nr. W. 10th St.; 646-449-9336.

Photo: Danny Kim

La Piazza’s assorted crostini, $15
House-smoked salmon with mascarpone and pickled shallots is one of four luscious morsels on the sampler plate. At Eataly, 200 Fifth Ave., nr. 23rd St.; 212-229-2560.

Photo: Danny Kim

Buvette’s aligot tartine, $7
Whip Cantal cheese into potato until it stretches like taffy. Add smoked ham. It might be the best thing to ever happen to a Royal Crown baguette. 42 Grove St., nr. Bleecker St.; 212-255-3590.

Photo: Danny Kim

Fatty ’Cue’s “dragon Pullman” with side of master fat, $4
Chinatown bread and rendered fat—a perfect, primordial marriage of toast and topping. 91 S. 6th St., nr. Berry St., Williamsburg; 718-599-3090.

Photo: Danny Kim

Vandaag’s grilled bacon smørrebrød, $12
The bacon is Benton’s, and the Rodenbach-beer bread is baked in-house. 103 Second Ave., at 6th St.; 212-253-0470.

Photo: Danny Kim

ABC Kitchen’s roasted-kabocha-squash toast with fresh ricotta and apple-cider vinegar, $10
Winter squash never had it so good—sweet, tangy, and smooth as velvet. 35 E. 18th St., nr. Broadway; 212-475-5829.

Photo: Danny Kim

Rubirosa’s meatball bruschetta, $2.50
A besciamella barrier keeps the tomato sauce from soaking through the filone bread. Genius. (And delicious). 235 Mulberry St., nr. Prince St.; 212-965-0500

Photo: Danny Kim

Co.’s cannellini bean toast, $4
Sorry, English people, these are the best beans on toast ever, and to think that the beans don’t even come out of a can. 230 Ninth Ave., at 24th St.; 212-243-1105

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Danny Kim
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