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How You Consume Pot Really Does Make a Difference

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Illustrations by Mark Nerys  

Burning
(Developed 1100 B.C.)
A pipe, joint, and blunt produce similar results: initial impact within two or three minutes, a peak at about 15 minutes, and back down after a couple of hours. Respiratory irritants make it rough on the lungs, especially when mixed with tobacco.


Edibles
(2700 B.C.)
There’s a different metabolic process when you eat pot—the drug has to to go through the liver first, which explains the problematic lag between eating and feeling high. In general, it takes about one and a half hours for the drug to kick in, and the high peaks after about two or three hours.


Vaporizing
(1980s)
A process to produce cleaner smoke, vaping heats the glands of the plant, releasing the gasses without igniting the plant. The high is slightly delayed, but you’ll know how high you are after about ten minutes. You’ll also cough less and avoid wheezing and chest tightness.


Dabbing
(2000s)
The street name for use of concentrated butane hash oil, which has THC concentrations as high as 90 percent, compared with typical pot concentration of about 10 to 15 percent. The result: a rapid and very strong high, the closest pot gets to crack (yet, anyway).


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