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The Season in Books

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September

Homer & Langley by E.L. Doctorow (Random House, Sept. 1)—A novel about New York’s infamous Collyer brothers.

Where Men Win Glory by John Krakauer (Doubleday, Sept. 15)—The adventure chronicler investigates friendly-fire victim Pat Tillman.

The Pattern in the Carpet by Margaret Drabble (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, September 16)—A novelist’s memoir of childhood, also a history of jigsaw puzzles.

Nocturnes by Kazuo Ishiguro (Knopf, September 22)—Five stories about musicians; the novelist’s first short-fiction book.

The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday; Sept. 22)—Another vivid dystopian world from Atwood, with ghastly animal hybrids and roving cults.

Spooner by Pete Dexter (Grand Central Publishing, Sept. 24)—A southern son and his adoptive father struggle to find common ground.

Generosity: An Enhancement by Richard Powers (FSG, Sept. 29)—Another foray into haute-philosophical sci-fi.


October

The Book of Genesis Illustrated by R. Crumb (W.W. Norton, Oct. 19)— God is Crumb’s co-writer on a project using only word-for-word Bible passages.

The Big Burn by Timothy Egan (HMH, Oct. 19)—The journalist-historian locates the birth of the conservation movement in a 1910 forest fire.

The Museum of Innocence by Orhan Pamuk (Knopf, Oct. 20)—Turkish Nobelist’s novel of a transgressive love affair; a panorama of Istanbul’s nightlife, high and low.


November

The Humbling by Philip Roth (HMH, Nov. 2)—Another short, dark work about aging, starring a new type of leering Lear—an actor past his prime.

Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer (Little, Brown, Nov. 2)—The Brooklyn writer’s memoir of on-and-off vegetarianism.

Churchill by Paul Johnson (Viking, Nov. 3)— A thorough new chronicle from the seasoned historian.

The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver (Harper, Nov. 5)— The author’s first novel since Prodigal Summer imagines a novelist facing the Red Scare.

Raymond Carver: A Writer’s Life by Carol Sklenicka (Scribner, Nov. 24)—The first-ever biography of the short-story pioneer.


Related:

Fall Preview 2009

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