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Walking into Nightwood’s 4,000-square-foot pop-up studio at 189 Schermerhorn Street in Downtown Brooklyn is like venturing into some kind of enchanted prairie town after all the homesteaders have left, complete with creaky-cool twig shelters, makeshift tepees, and burlap-upholstered armchairs. Owners Myriah Scruggs and Nadia Yaron, seen here with their dog Captain, will be presenting their new Ghost line of furniture and home décor, as well as a smattering of works from their artist friends, through December 14. Aim to visit the weekends of December 4–5 and 11–12, when they will be hosting a holiday bazaar (nightwoodny.com).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This tepee, like other skeletal shelters inside the gallery, isn’t for sale or for habitation—it’s just for a little atmosphere.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Nadia and Myriah create new pieces from found furniture and salvaged fabrics and wood. These chairs are covered in linen and painted fabrics ($120), and the table is made from collected wood fragments ($315).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The chairs here are covered in tea-dyed linen ($880). The hanging lamp is by Fiyel Levent ($350,) who designed a number of other pieces in the gallery.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The framed house was inspired by Virginia Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The elegance of the wood-framed Orlando chair is offset by the recycled-denim seat and arms. (It has been sold since I shot this, but it’ll soon be replaced by a similar one-of-a-kind piece.)

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This armchair was deconstructed and then reconstructed with burlap, linen, and hemp ($700).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The Bauhaus couch ($1,245) is at once completely modern, with canvas cushions embellished by abstract fabric scraps, and comfortably retro, thanks to its vintage wooden frame.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Another shelter, this one with twigs for walls.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A closer look at the laser-cut paper shade by Fiyel Levent.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This rubber mold of tree bark on the floor is more of an art object than an actual rug.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This vignette reminds me of a nun’s room I saw in a convent in Peru, wherein the Sister had delicately hung her self-flagellation implements on her wall. These horsehair cabinet pulls ($85) by Fiyel Levent have the same elegance and mystery.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Another Fiyel Levent piece: a folding screen made of laser-cut paper ($10,000).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

These constellation pillows ($60 each) are embroidered on tie-dyed, recycled canvas.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A selection of wood-burned illustrations by artist Jess Rotter ($200 to $275).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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