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The latest addition to the flood of new design stores on Atlantic Avenue in Boerum Hill is Bright Lyons (383 Atlantic Ave., nr. Bond St.; 718-855 5463), a mid-century-modern specialist owned by Paul Bright, seen here. Bright is a former punk-rocker, art collector, and antique-furniture flipper from London, Ontario, who recently opened this vibrant storefront and filled it with his collection of design books, art, prints, furniture, and ephemera, including some of his old punk flyers.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

On my visit last weekend, I found an Eames sofa ($3,000) covered in vintage Alexander Girard fabric beside a George Nelson coffee table ($2,500) with space carved out in the center for a planter. The pumpkin-orange sixties plastic Pastil chair ($900) is by Eero Aarnio.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Bright previously owned an art gallery in Toronto, and here the walls are punctuated by bold, colorful works by Marc Bell, Rich Jacobs, and Taylor McKimens.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I was drawn to the wonderful assortment of art-and-design books throughout the shop. Bright has about a thousand more books in the basement.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A swing-arm table ($800) by George Nelson alongside a collage by Bjorn Copeland ($3,000).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This incredibly rare sample book of Alexander Girard fabrics ($5,000) will be part of a show Bright is curating in the shop this spring.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The leather slipper chairs in the foreground are by George Nelson ($2,200 for the pair), as is the table behind them ($1,500). Like the circular coffee table in the front, this one also has a slot in the center for a terrarium or centerpiece.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The place settings by Alexander Girard are from a collection he did for Braniff Airlines ($100 for each setting; $15 per mug); the photo is by Naomi Harris ($1,900).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Some more fabric samples from Girard, these created for Herman Miller wallpapers ($5,000 with the previous fabric-sample book).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Personally, I’d use this boxy blue Donald Judd chair ($4,700) as a bookshelf rather than as seating. The table it sits on is by Alvar Aalto ($900), and the still life behind them is by Misaki Kawai ($9,000).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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