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If there’s one thing that Robert Verdi, the ever-colorful entrepreneur, TV host, celebrity stylist, interior designer, and legendary party-thrower absolutely hates, it’s an empty white box. For the 2,200-square-foot event space he built in the garment district four years ago, he envisaged the very opposite of an emotionless cube. He wanted a public space that felt personal, where the dining chairs (from the Belgium company Sixinch) are dipped in bright-blue latex, the cast-concrete tables look like tree branches, and the light fixtures are comprised of handblown glass orbs (from Lindsey Adelman Studio).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

“I made that mess,” says Robert, looking at this photo of the loft after he purchased and gutted it. The property is now a moveable feast of inventive design—though it’s not without its quirks. “Sometimes I think there is a ghost in here, but then I realize the white flutter shooting past me is only a letter going down the public mail chute. It’s still in use for the building.”

Photo: Courtesy of Robert Verdi

Robert put down a solid wide-plank walnut floor and stained it a deep-plum color. The cabinetry is from Plain & Fancy; the counter surface is crystal stone.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Next to the Sub-Zero wine fridge in the studio’s kitchen is a wonderful mirror by Hervé Van der Straeten.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Every inch of the space has been maxed out for storage—including the kitchen island, with pullout drawers for place mats, napkins, and napkin rings.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Both the gold chandelier (made with recycled children’s toys) and the wood and Lucite chairs in the parlor off the main room are from Luciano Lorenzatti.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The chandelier up close.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The space’s biggest surprise: a spa with Kohler tub and shower outfitted with LED lighting and ambient sounds that change along with the lighting schemes (see the next slide for a shower-lighting demo).

Photo: Courtesy of Robert Verdi

Robert demonstrates the various light settings, so that I could make my own Warhol portrait of him.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The back half of the loft includes a living area, where guests can relax and watch movies.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

One of two inlaid-wood chests from Wisteria; this one is topped with Jonathan Adler vases.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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