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This is the view from outside of Desmond’s restaurant, which just opened opposite Bloomingdale’s at 153 East 60th Street. Until recently, this neoclassical gem of a building was the office and showroom of interior designer Richard Keith Langham. I am happy to report that the new incarnation is still in the best of hands, and feels like an updated version of great New York dining arenas like El Morocco and the Stork Club.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The restaurant and its elegant bar area were pretty much a DIY affair for the three partners who conceived and implemented the design: TV and music producer John Loeffler, a founder of Indochine; Richard O’Hagan, who, before launching his events-and-catering company, trained under Sir Terence Conran and worked for Mark Birley in London; and chef David Hart, who formerly worked at Soho House and Firmdale Hotels.

Photo: Courtesy of Desmond’s

The main floor of the dining room has such a luxury of space. It practically invites you to get up between courses and take a spin around the room.

Photo: Courtesy of Desmond’s

The view from the mezzanine, which is available for intimate dining and parties.

Photo: Courtesy of Desmond’s

From his open kitchen, Hart whips up simple American and English fare like scrambled eggs over smoked salmon topped with caviar.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

At the bottom of the staircase leading up to the mezzanine, I felt like Cary Grant might have been waiting for me around the corner.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

To make the mezzanine-dining experience even more heavenly, there’s a working fireplace.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Pineapple lamps on the tables and throughout the restaurant were designed and made by the multi-talented O’Hagan.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

And here is chef Hart, hiding behind a wall of flame.

Photo: Courtesy of Desmond’s

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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