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Star designer Todd Oldham is always up to something new and inspiring, which is why I had to pay a visit to his and partner Tony Longoria’s office in lower Manhattan. I knew I’d come to the right place the minute I got off the elevator. In place of the former law partners’ names on the front door, they simply slapped on Todd’s initials in paint. His full name, to the right, was made using nailheads painted over with white-out. Finally, they added self-stick wood marquetry shelf paper for a bit of embellishment.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The entrance to the office is covered with Ikea floorboards that Todd and Tony laid into a stripe pattern. “This is actually the least expensive floor we could put down,” Todd says. The ostrich photograph is by Todd and is part of a forthcoming book of his animal portraits.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Here is Todd and his queenly dog, Ann, in the studio. “We gutted the place,” Todd says of the original layout when they moved in. “It was a pleasure to build an office to match the activity.” Lately, he and Tony have been working on a multimedia project called Kid Made Modern, based on a book of the same name that teaches kids crafts in the style of different designers.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I spent literally an hour on the floor looking at minis of Todd’s next book on Alexander Girard, to be published by AMMO this December. Todd was given rare access to the American design master’s personal archives, and the book promises to unveil the full range of his work. The cafeteria table in the rear was bought at schooloutfitters.com.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Another view of the office, with a wood-cut jewel covered in wool felt in the middle of the pass-through window. This is one of a series of 100 jewels that Todd has made with the help of a chain-saw artist. A pair of oil paintings by Wayne White hang at right.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Tony’s south-facing office is flooded with light—a perfect lounge for Ann. When I asked if Ann was spelled with an e, Todd answered “Ann is far too busy for an extra e. The giant wall sculpture, by Wayne White, reads, “I am lost on a spaceship momma.” The photograph of the computer console behind Tony’s desk is by Todd Eberle.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Overlooking Trinity Church Cemetery, Tony’s office windowsill contains another of Todd’s wood jewels, this one bisected by a wooden ax purchased “from a very relaxed man at the Melrose swap meet.” Also here: Lucia Stern wood sculptures, as well as cups, glasses, and bowls from a tabletop collection that Todd is doing for Fishs Eddy this June. The hook rug was a gift from the singer Leslie Hall, who made it from her mother’s spandex costumes. All of the carpeting throughout the office is by Todd Oldham for Durkan.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Todd and Tony have the late artist Lucia Stern’s painted wood sculptures throughout the office.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Todd’s office is filled with pieces from his fascinating art collection, which includes works by Martyn Cross, Raymond Pettibon, Fred Tomaselli, Mark Todd, and Charley Harper—as well as a bronze gorilla.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The photograph at the back of Todd’s office is by Corinne May Botz, who shot miniature crime scenes that are used as teaching tools by forensics teams. (The picture of Cindy Sherman was torn from a magazine and taped on top of the photo.) The bookshelves in the foreground, Todd says, “were made by slicing plywood into two pieces. Then I glued and screwed them back together into this shape.”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

At first I thought these were battery boxes or transistor radios. Actually, they are a collection of painted cardboard, wood, and steel sculptures by Kiel Johnson.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

One of Todd’s current inspirations—“A treasure of design in all ways”—is this original Herman Miller poster announcing Alexander Girard’s new store on East 53rd Street back in 1961.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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