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Artist Madeline Weinrib, who launched her carpet-designing career in 1998, has since grown her business to include upholstered furniture, fashion, and accessories. Madeline is the granddaughter of Max Weinrib, the founder of ABC Carpet & Home, and her 3,000-square-foot studio on lower Fifth Avenue could not be a more perfect showcase for her work (madelineweinrib.com). I wanted to moved right in. Here, one of her Cavalier King Charles spaniels, Daphne, greeted me at the door before settling down on an antique Suzani rug bought from designer Jack Lenor Larsen.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This vignette shows how great the marriage between vintage and modern can be. Madeline has upholstered vintage Corbusier chairs in her Collins fabric and the swan chairs in her Daphne fabric (named after you know who). The Tibetan carpet is one of her designs, called Westley.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The antique wood armoire in the entrance area is a Scandinavian piece from ABC. The painting above the armoire is by Madeline, the photo to the left is by Christo, and the drawing below is by René Ricard.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Madeline has an extensive textile library in the loft. The portrait of the Dalai Lama on the ground at far right is by Nicholas Vreeland. The photograph on the far left and the painting to its right are by Madeline herself.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Madeline holds meetings over a large marble-top table in the corner of the loft. The chairs are by Paul McCobb and the hanging light fixture is by David Weeks (available at Ralph Pucci). The Tulu carpet is from Madeline’s own production, made in Turkey from Angora-goat hair.

Photo: Courtesy of Madeline Weinrib

“The sideboard opposite the table is antique Anglo-Indian from ABC, which is a style of furniture I love,” Madeline says. The painting is by Stefan Bondell and the Kurland ice bucket is from the Neue Galerie.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Here is Madeline in the office area of her loft. “I sit on the floor a lot when I am working,” she says. “I like to spread things out and find a desk very confining.” She is wearing a dress of her own fabric designed by Soledad Twombly. The photograph of the sleeping man at left is by Nan Goldin. The curtains are Madeline’s design made of chiffon. “I collaborate a lot with a designer named Dean Holdiman. It was his idea to use chiffon as a window treatment. I think it is a very sexy fabric to use as drapery.”

Photo: Courtesy of Madeline Weinrib

Elsewhere in the office: a vintage Korean metal chest with two handles from Mohr & McPherson in Boston, and an antique Venetian mirror from ABC. Her travels to Morocco and India have obviously inspired her décor.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Madeline has designed a collection of kimonos for the Neue Galerie inspired by this Madame d’Ora photograph.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A detail of one of the kimonos.

Photo: Courtesy of Neue Galerie

I love Madeline’s newest Suzani fabric, which was inspired by Matisse. I would cover every inch of a small bedroom with this. The fabric is completely hand-embroidered (the word suzani, Madeline explained, means “by needle” in Farsi).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This American Gothic armchair will be available at Barneys this spring. The fabric is called Mu—“one of my favorite designs,” Madeline says. The pillows are all antique textiles.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Madeline has collected vintage Indian photographs on her travels over the years, and she keeps a selection of them at the studio.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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