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When Michael Bruno, founder of the furniture and antiques site 1stdibs.com, approached James Druckman, the president and CEO of the New York Design Center, two years ago with the idea of creating a physical storefront for some of the site’s dealers, Druckman had an “ah-ha” moment: “I was glad to see the pendulum swinging back to bricks and mortar,” he says. He then went about redesigning the 33,000-square-foot tenth floor of the center to accommodate 54 1stdibs dealers, with more on the waiting list. In the middle of the floor, there is an exhibit space where the British company Soane has currently installed some of its latest designs, including the handsome Yatch table ($24,800) and the Rattan side table ($6,400) against the wall.

Photo: Marili Forastieri

I love mutt portraits (not that this Scottish deerhound is a mutt by any standard!). I spotted him on the floor of the Soane space before it was hung on the wall. He could be mine if I found about $29,000 under my mattress.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Druckman designed wonderful airy gallery spaces revealing the original ten-foot ceilings. He installed a Japanese air-conditioning system that allowed him to dispense with cumbersome ductwork—well worth the investment.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Walking around this floor is like strolling through the always serendipitous Paris Flea Market. I found these seventies stacking tables from Darrell Dean Antiques & Decorative Arts ($1,600).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I love this set of twenties faux-bamboo armchairs and bench from Berns Fry ($5,400). The wonderful sculpted-wood floor lamp is $1,950.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This gorgeous white leather octagonal Jansen table ($15,500) at the Pascal Boyer Gallery is a perfect match for …

Photo: Wendy Goodman

… A glorious lambskin-covered bench. It just sold for $9,500.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A pair of polished patent-leather club chairs for spiffing up a library, say, or a black-and-white living room? They can be yours for $10,500 from Caira Mandaglio.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

How about an English nineteenth-century drafting table from Judith and James Milne for $3,450? Very nice.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I could see Kitty Hawks adoring this duo of Brazilian rosewood side tables with glass tops from Thomas Hayes Gallery. The pair goes for $3,500.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Prime Gallery is carrying a lot of crazy elegant James Mont furniture, like this fifties slipper chair (one of a pair) covered in the darkest-green mohair velvet ($6,800 for both).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

And how about these amazing shell-covered pogodas from an unknown designer ($4,800), also at Prime? They look very Tony Duquette to me, but could be by James Mont too.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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