1 of 7

New York Magazine celebrated Design Week—as well as the new A8 sedan from our partner Audi—by gathering five of our favorite local designers at a pop-up gallery at Chelsea’s Drive In Studios. The designers—from left, Dominic Kozerski and Enrico Bonetti of Bonetti/Kozerski Studio, Jim Zivic, Lindsey Adelman, and John Houshmand (plus Chris Lehrecke, who is not pictured)—each contributed one emblematic piece.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

John Houshmand has been working in wood for over a decade, having co-owned a construction company before founding his own design firm in 2003. His latest piece, the Cast Aluminum Table, beautifully couples wood grain and polished metal. “There’s a great sort of dance that takes place between taking something organic and casting it in an inorganic material,” John says. “It’s a very large piece of jewelry in a sense.”

Photo: Neilson Barnard

These sculptural totem poles are part of a collection Chris Lehrecke designed for Ralph Pucci International and are fashioned from various woods including cherry and walnut.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

The design duo Bonetti/Kozerski created a soothing place in which to recline and relax—and rock out. The leather rocking chaise incorporates a bluetooth-operated sound system into the headrest.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

This bale of organic Texas cotton was encased in leather by Jim Zivic to create the Cotton Bale ottoman for Pucci. It serves as an excellent “party bench,” as he puts it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

Streamlining the traditional multipart light, Lindsay Adelman’s hanging lamps from her Catch collection fuse handblown glass directly to brass hardware. “I was trying to reinvent the expected assembly,” says Lindsay. “I wanted them to feel sort of jewelry-like, like a drooping gesture.”

Photo: Neilson Barnard

The centerpiece of the event, of course, was experiencing the Audi A8. Guests couldn’t wait to get inside.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

The centerpiece of the event, of course, was experiencing the Audi A8. Guests couldn’t wait to get inside.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Neilson Barnard
Advertising