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Artist Rebekah Maysles lives in a wonderfully layered apartment in Harlem, the same neighborhood where you can find the Maysles Cinema (mayslesinstitute.org), the nonprofit documentary movie house founded by her father, filmmaker Albert Maysles. She has a great imagination and lets color be the driving force behind her décor. Her kitchen is green and pink, which, she says, “look perfect together. I have some memory that my uncle wore a lot of pink and green.” (Her uncle, David Maysles, co-directed the famed 1975 documentary Grey Gardens with Albert.) “The kitchen cabinets are from all over the place. The tiles on the floor are from Morocco. I wish the lamp was Tiffany, but I think it came from my mom’s house.”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This is the cover of Rebekah’s 2009 book Grey Gardens, which she did with her sister Sara and their father. It gives a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the film, with added photographs, production notes, and stills from the movie, along with original art. “My sister was working on the archives and thought it would be great to make a book that was like a love letter and also a gift to fans,” she says.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Rebekah’s living room has its own Grey Gardens vibe, the difference being happy-functional clutter that invites you in rather than repels you. And yes, there are cats, but not an army of them! “The long sofa is from a thrift shop and is great to sleep on,” she says. “The green chairs are also from a thrift shop, and for some reason I don’t like them so I let the cats use them for fun. Somehow this prevents them from messing up the other sofas.”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A relatively quiet dining area just past the kitchen is decorated with a Moroccan rug and more thrift-store finds.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Rebekah painted the cabinet she found in a church thrift shop after her mother gave her a World of Interiors magazine. “It had all of this painted furniture in it, and it looked so beautiful,” she says.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The bathroom walls are covered in ceramic tiles Rebekah found in Morocco and a wall hanging from India.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The dresses hanging in Rebekah’s bedroom were found in thrift shops. “Somehow I couldn’t muster up the strength to wear the coral one, but I love it and think it looks like a sculpture.”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A collection of paintings by Rebekah’s family, including one by her mother, who painted it with her own mother on Fishers Island, where the Maysles have a summer house. “The simple sunset with the deep-red colors [at bottom] was made by my brother when he was little.”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Some unfinished artworks that Rebekah is doing for her next project for Anthropologie. These cutouts in her studio are going to be used in a collage.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This collection of plates Rebekah designed for Anthropologie has sold out, but she is working on new plates and a collection of sheets and wallpaper to be released soon.

Photo: Courtesy of Anthropologie

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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