1 of 7

DesigNYC was founded in 2009 by a volunteer group of design professionals (of which I am one) with the goal of improving life in the city through the power of good design. Among the group’s first round of twelve projects was one for Enterprise Community Partners, a leading nonprofit provider of affordable housing. DesigNYC linked Enterprise with design firm Sohbr Studio and a project coordinator from CAMBA to redo the public spaces of 880 Willoughby in Bushwick, which provides apartments for low-income residents. Here is the entrance lobby before (left) and after the renovation. The warmth of reclaimed-wood wall paneling provided by Pioneer Millworks completely changes the mood.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

The elevator lobby/atrium was a bit cold and empty before the addition of a few warm coats of Valspar paint, wood paneling by Pioneer Millworks, lounge seating from Room & Board, and tables from Tucker Robbins. A bamboo tree is from Garden Works; the planter was donated by Restoration Hardware; the Shona sculpture is titled Witness Bonjisi.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

One of the most important rooms in the building is the Community room, where residents gather to visit, watch TV, and hold meetings. Walls were painted with Valspar Coconut Milk, then overlaid with an inspirational printed mural by Duggal Visual Solutions and installed by A. Tempo. The table seating is by Virco. The carbon tables are from CB2, and the lounge seating is from Room & Board. The planters are from Restoration Hardware and the plants are from Garden Works.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

Another view of the community room: The new library niche in the corner makes such a huge difference! The wood for the custom built-in library is from Pioneer Millworks.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

The garden had such potential before, and now it is really thriving, with additional plants and trees and some great landscaping with the help of donations from Garden Works.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

The fifth-floor solarium has become much more welcoming. The solar shades are from Smith + Noble, and the window-box plants are from Garden Works. The club chairs are from West Elm and side tables are by Tucker Robbins. The custom wood barn door was fabricated by Will III.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

Decorative painter Lillian Heard completed the mural painting in the hallway leading to the solarium with a team of volunteers and with paint from Farrow & Ball. A great job done by all!

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Gabriele Gorden; Kate Glicksberg (inset)
Advertising