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Pinch Food Design is a newly launched catering company co-owned by a chef, Bob Spiegel, and a designer, TJ Girard. Befitting its parentage, the company is a bit of a culinary-design hybrid, with Bob overseeing its array of bite-size “mini-foods” and TJ coming up with innovative ways to display and serve everything. I dropped by their first event last week, a party for a business client in Grand Central’s Vanderbilt Hall. The first thing I saw was this hedge of hors d’oeuvre standing straight up like an edible picket fence.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I spied Bob getting ready at the Chef’s Table, which is covered with a thin, easy-to-clean silicone cloth. TJ designed the table herself, modeling it after a typical sawhorse worktable and adding flourishes like a flowing molded base.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

With a spray bottle and a squeegee, TJ demonstrates just how simple it is to clean the silicone table cover.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

TJ took me around to the back area, where her team was preparing mini-foods. I loved these trays outfitted with repurposed drawer pulls that would act as little food pedestals. So clever!

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Another unusual serving tray by TJ. You can understand why they call their catering tools “food furniture.”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The Honey Comb Tray is made of white acrylic and fitted with a removable honeycomb-cutout lining that helps food stay in place.

Photo: Kerri Brewer

The Pinch logo on Bob’s jacket

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This architectural Walnut Matrix tray could be an object on your table when it’s not being passed around at a party.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

These stands are devised for easy access to hors d’oeuvres on the floor.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I thought this was pretty ingenious: hanging savory breads off copper hooks. The system was inspired, TJ says, by her mother’s hanging copper pots at home.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A woven rubber basket (one of the rare Pinch pieces TJ did not design) can be used for displaying greens or just about anything else.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

TJ thought this copper bird feeder would be a good napkin holder. I am sold.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Solving the classic cocktail-party conundrum, they designed this glass-plate combo so that the former easily fits atop the latter.

Photo: Kerri Brewer

The wood and ceramic Spoke Tray is ideal for serving mini-doughnuts.

Photo: Kerri Brewer

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Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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