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Steve Coleman, a freelance corporate-events planner—specializing in “sales meetings, not parties,” he notes—and his partner, hairstylist Michael Wang, have lived in a duplex condo in Williamsburg since November 2007. Their 625-square-foot back yard was originally the concrete pit you see here, but, says Steve, “we always knew we wanted more. The trees were beginning to outgrow their pots, and we knew we needed to take action.”

Photo: Steve Coleman

So they hired Martin Rogal, a carpenter and plumber who sidelines as a male model, to build out this great green oasis. With Martin’s assistance, Steve designed a trio of four-by-twelve-foot cedar platforms perched above the concrete. Adjustable legs help to level each platform and allow for drainage underneath. Each piece can be removed for cleaning or maintenance.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Here is a shot of Martin mid-project. Coincidentally, Steve and Michael’s one-man construction crew also was the first man to appear on the cover of New York’s “Weddings” issue last spring (inset).

Photo: Steve Coleman

The view from the apartment’s sliding-glass doors shows the dining table that Steve and Michael use in the summer months.

Photo: Steve Coleman

Another view of the garden’s various levels, with planks varying in width between three and six inches. The direction of the planks changes from platform to platform, giving the illusion of more space.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

One section opens to show the height of the platforms (about three feet) from the concrete floor below.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Here, Miso, the couple’s Senegal parrot, enjoys the great outdoors. Steve and Michael’s five cats also have garden privileges.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The base of this garden fountain was repurposed from a sink found in the apartment. The fountain’s white fiberglass exterior was purchased at Crate & Barrel and filled with rocks. The planters, benches, and dining table are from Ikea.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A decorative trellis in front of the concrete wall was made from scrap lumber.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Leftover plank lumber was used to camouflage the storage shed behind the door.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A small rock garden was planted in fiberglass boxes that match the tree boxes. “I thought I would need two or three bags of rocks,” Steve says. “I ended up needing seven 50-pound bags!”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

All of the lumber for the garden had to pass through these windows. (The staircase inside is too narrow to move anything large from street to backyard.) The whole project took just six weeks to complete.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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