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Photo: Iwan Baan

The tenth-floor store near the garage is a commercial hub.

Photo: Iwan Baan

All residents have electricity now, but privacy is harder-won.

Photo: Iwan Baan

The good life: painted walls, a stereo, and a breeze in the curtain.

Photo: Iwan Baan

Various micro-businesses squeeze into leftover spaces.

Photo: Iwan Baan

An open-air gym with train wheels for some of the weights.

Photo: Iwan Baan

If you choose to go straight ahead after you enter, you will ascend these stairs to the gallery exhibition space and Clay Bar.

Photo: Iwan Baan

And here we are at the Clay Bar, where you can just pull up a stool and make dinosaurs or crocodiles or puppies or whatever your heart desires. The room will be staffed by an artist who can lend help whenever it’s needed.

Photo: Iwan Baan

Now we are looking at the great Sink-o-Rama in the painting studio for older kids (up to age 14).

Photo: Iwan Baan

Look closer at the Sink-o-Rama (or the washing well, as some call it), and you can see the floor foot pedals for starting and stopping the water flow.

Photo: Iwan Baan

One side of the exhibit gallery features a model of Moondog the Viking Man, a real New York character back in the sixties who used to stand on Sixth Avenue near the CBS building dressed exactly like this. Where have all those characters gone?

Photo: Iwan Baan

Elsewhere, you can see renderings of famous apartment buildings designed by the Austrian artist and architect Hundertwasser. On the right, a model of one of his amazing nature-inspired buildings.

Photo: Iwan Baan

A case of Keith Haring memorabilia, including his sneakers.

Photo: Iwan Baan

Throughout the museum, there’s gorgeous color in expected and unexpected places including the hallway leading to the studios and a quiet room.

Photo: Iwan Baan

At left, a detail of Sean’s Monet pieces, and at right, a photograph of the dining room at Giverny that inspired ­Sean’s project. Sean’s work is in the permanent collection of the Whitney Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others.

Photo: Iwan Baan

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Iwan Baan

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Iwan Baan

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Iwan Baan

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Iwan Baan

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Iwan Baan

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Iwan Baan
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