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Gallerist-collector Liz O’Brien has finally brought her incredible eye to her own furniture collection, Editions, which launched just last week in her gallery at 306 East 61st Street (lizobrien.com). The moment I walked in and saw this installation of fabric-wrapped, high-gloss-finished Albert tables, I felt happy. This collection is the perfect antidote to the boxy, ashen furniture that has been in vogue for too long.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For the launch last week, Liz worked with artist-designer Richard Gillette to create the wall colors and decorative schemes. This gorgeous Pamela Sofa is inspired by the neo-Baroque glamour of the thirties.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The divine Frances dining chair comes in many different finishes and fabrics.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The photomural was conceived by Gilette, and (at least accoring to me) should be in Liz’s line of wallpapers, still in development. A larger version of the Pamela sofa, with hand-carved hardwood legs that remind me of sets in Fred Astaire movies.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The Jayne sofa comes with or without fringe. But why would you want it without fringe?

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For more tailored tastes, here’s the Jayne without the fringe.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Liz’s office is the coziest, most elegant little hideaway. The blue wallcovering is billiard-table felt. The high-backed custom banquette sofa is also Liz’s design. I have always been tempted to ask her if she could make me one.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Liz also sells lamps and wonderful crystal votive holders.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The Billy lounge chair also has an ottoman (not shown). The Editions collection needs to be seen in person for a good dose of cheer.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The coffee table is always set with a fresh gift from florist Ronaldo Maia, who has sent flowers to Rosamond twice a week since John died in 2008. “Can you imagine?” she says. “He found my favorite rose, Rosamundo. I had it in my French garden. I don’t know how he found those! We have this great long-distance romance.” The sculpture is by Henry Moore and the ear sculpture and “We Love You” tile are from Louise Bourgeois. “She told me, ‘You talk, we listen.’ ” Rosamond says. The silver crosses are from Ethiopia.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The Jansen dining table is where Rosamond used to lay out the slides for all of her Met lectures.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The April 1961 cover of L’Oeil magazine. “It was everything that interested me,” she says. “I would just think of things, or hear of things, or read about something, and off I would go.”

Photo: Wendy Goodman

A spread in L’Oeil from on the seventeenth-century Strasbourg artist Sébastien Stoskopff. This painting, from 1633, is called Les Cinq Sens ou l’eté (The Five Senses of Summer).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Rosamond today. “Luck has a lot to do with everything—luck and timing,” she says. “I happened to be in Europe when the great men were still around. Had it been now, it would have been entirely different.”

Photo: Michele Mattei

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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