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The Living Room

“We initially bought paper in 61 colors and eventually chose 21 to work with,” says co-designer Gene Meyer. The color blast offsets the vintage Florence Knoll sofa, silk fauteuils, and side tables designed by Gene and Doug (dougandgenemeyer.com). The painting over the sofa is by Antonio Murado; the small painting is by Philip Taaffe. The painting on the left is by Mark Sheinkman.

Photo: Floto + Warner

The Bedroom

“The paper odyssey started here,” says Doug, who chose two shades of blue and one of orchid to create “a subtle vibration and glow, almost like a sunset.” Warhol’s Marilyn is above the dresser. The mounted sculpture is by Cristina Lei Rodriguez.

Photo: Floto + Warner

The Work Desk in the Living Room

Gene and Doug use a Pierre Cardin–designed table as their work desk. The painting inlaid with mother of pearl in back of the desk is by Nancy Lorenz.

Photo: Floto + Warner

The Hallway and Front Door

Gene and Doug divided the laborious paper-installation process, with Doug creating the bedroom walls and Gene designing the hall and living room walls. The photograph of the woman in red is by Richard Avedon and the triptych to the right is by Louise Lawler.

Photo: Floto + Warner

The Hallway View Toward Bedroom

The runner—in what they call a Triangular Too pattern—is part of Doug and Gene’s line, which is sold at studiofournyc.com. The fashion illustration on the floor below the Richard Avedon photograph is by Kenneth Paul Block.

Photo: Floto + Warner

The Art Piece

Doug created this cardboard, collage, and paint sculpture in 2010.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner

Slide Header

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Floto + Warner
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