1 of 11

Perusing the treasures at the Park Avenue Armory’s Winter Antiques Show (through January 30; winterantiquesshow.com) is a yearly treat for me. But what makes it really special is that all ticket sales benefit the heroic work that goes on at East Side House Settlement (eastsidehouse.org) in the South Bronx. I visited three of the settlement’s sites last week and was totally overwhelmed and inspired by the people I met. At the Mott Haven Community Center, director Vernell Reed showed me this classroom used by some of the 200 kids in the settlement’s early-childhood program.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Since tickets to the antiques show benefit such a good cause, you can feel less guilty while browsing objects like these late-nineteenth-century French milliner’s heads from Robert Young Antiques ($7,000 for both).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

These late-period Egyptian bronze eyes (664–332 B.C.) stopped me in my tracks; they’re yours from Peter Petrou Antiques for a cool $33,000.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

These unusual burr-wood toggles made of hua-mu (flowery wood) are nineteenth-century Chinese fixtures used to create a pouch in clothing. They are sold by Peter Petrou as a set of fourteen for $15,500.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Lost City Arts has some incredible wall art. This fiber panel is by Sheila Hicks ($45,000; 1970).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

One of the other great things about the antiques show is getting to see the extraordinary restored rooms on the ground floor of the armory. Here is the fireplace of the Veterans Room, designed in part by Louis C. Tiffany and Stanford White in 1880–81. The massive fireplace is decorated with red bricks, red marble, and blue-glass tiles.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Another amazing piece from Robert Young Antiques: a Central European folk-art marriage cupboard, made in about 1830 ($16,000).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Cora Ginsburg is famous for her extraordinary and timeless fabrics, accessories, and period clothing. I especially love this Scottish crewel-and-silk bed hanging, made circa 1720 ($45,000).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Liz O’Brien has an inviting booth filled with pieces like this Maison Jansen scallop-backed settee from Lady Louis Mountbatten’s bedroom in Brook House in London ($48,000). The wallpaper is from Studio Printworks.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Liz is also showing a sweet little corral settee, by Syrie Maugham ($14,500).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

And speaking of sweet, how about this: the “bookstand” at the Mott Haven Community Center, which (it’s worth repeating) is supported in part by proceeds from the antiques show. To directly aid the Mott Haven program, buy a ticket to tomorrow’s Young Collector’s Night, which I’ll be hosting ($175; 7–9 p.m.; click here for tickets). Not only will you get to chat up some of the hottest interior designers around; you’ll be helping the city’s most vulnerable kids as well.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
Advertising