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I first met Lana Turner, the indefatigable real-estate broker, a few years ago through writer Michael Henry Adams. I’ve always been fascinated by her crazy inventiveness and extreme organizational talents, both of which helped her realize this ongoing project in Harlem: a fashion installation held inside of a four-story townhouse Lana is co-brokering at 56 Hamilton Terrace (listing price: $1.585 million; open houses held Sundays from noon–2 p.m.; see more). All of the vintage dresses, accessories, and memorabilia are Lana’s own. Here is the townhouse’s front parlor.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This gorgeous frame has been redeployed as an installation for a beautiful garden-party dress.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Lana has thought of everything: here, a desktop covered with postcards and photographs to make a wonderful still life.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

My favorite space: a guest room on the garden level that Lana has staged as a music room after a wild party.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Another room I love: the second-floor master bedroom with two more of Lana’s vintage dresses.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Back at Lana’s apartment nearby on Convent Avenue, the living room is surprisingly spare. Much of her furniture has been relocated to the Hamilton Terrace property for the duration of the installation (likely through March).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This is more like it! A parlor off the living room crowded with part of Lana’s huge handbag collection.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

And this is Lana herself. She is modeling a hat made by the Detroit milliner Leza Piazza. The amazing facsimile of a medieval head-covering is one of 400 pieces in Lana’s hat collection.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Lana is constantly hosting tea parties and salon readings, and she spends an inordinate amount of time baking goodies in her tidy kitchen, which is "perennially under renovation."

Photo: Wendy Goodman

When she is traveling, Lana sends letters and postcards to herself—a diary from the road, you could say.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Like everything else in her apartment, Lana’s CD collection is meticulously assembled.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman
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