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1. Filmmaker Max Scott was riding his bicycle in 2002 when he first spied a "for sale" sign outside a charming, if slightly forlorn, cottage in Springs, Long Island. (If the name rings a bell, it's because the South Fork town was once home to abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock and his circle of creative friends.) Scott immediately called friend and artist Pamela Morgan to tell her he'd found the perfect house for her—and it turned out he was right. Morgan purchased the property that year, and that's when her story begins. Here, the cottage's front door and small entrance hall, exactly as she found it.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

"I pulled into the driveway with the real-estate agent, and my heart ached," recalls Morgan. "I said, 'I'll take it.' I felt it; that is the way you have to buy a house." Morgan later discovered that the property had belonged to writer Patsy Southgate, who lived in it after divorcing husband and ­writer-adventurer Peter Matthiesson. It was Southgate who painted a blue runner on the wood stairs. The oldest part of the house dates back to the 1700s, according to Morgan's neighbors (who happen to own the oldest house in Springs).

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The original beamed ceiling and wood floors make the living room feel cozy in wintertime, especially when the fireplace is lit (not pictured). Morgan's sister, Alida, is an artist and landscape designer; she made the two flower paintings seen on the wall near the dining table.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The kitchen window, filled with found feathers and ripe vegetables, overlooks the garden that Morgan planted with Alida's help. "But mostly the garden is me, blood, sweat, and tears," she says. When she first started digging, she unearthed the original brick path of a former garden and found artifacts from decades and centuries past. "Creating it involved a surprising bit of archaeology," she says.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The kitchen looks toward the original screened-in porch, which, in summertime, doubles as a great room.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Summer dinners are served by candlelight. Says Morgan, "We use it for our summer breakfast, lunch, dinner, and teatime."

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The upstairs guest room was renovated to reveal the full pitch of the ceiling.

Morgan's studio, located off her bedroom, faces a small cottage on the property. "It was basically two houses joined by a hallway,"she says of the additions, one done in the 1800s and another in the 1980s.

A section of the exterior showing the addition that Southgate built in the eighties for her friend, Joe LeSeur, who was Frank O'Hara's lover (and who also wrote a book about him). Southgate and O'Hara were best friends and are buried beside each other in the Green River Cemetery in Springs.

Reginald Chan (left) Third Avenue and 17th Street. On September 15, 2006, Chan was hit by a flatbed tow truck while making a delivery of Chinese food.

Brandie Bailey Houston and Essex Streets. On May 8, 2005, Bailey was struck by a private sanitation truck while on her way home to Williamsburg after waitressing at the West Village restaurant Red Bamboo. Bailey was a regular at CBGB, where a memorial was held in her honor.

Craig Murphey (left) Ten Eyck Street and Union Avenue, Williamsburg. Early in the morning of October 18, 2007, Murphey was biking home from escorting his date to her South Williamsburg apartment. According to police reports, Murphey attempted to outrun a gas truck turning left on Ten Eyck Street. His pelvis shattered on impact, and he was pronounced dead at the scene. In his honor, over 40 friends have since received tattoos that read BE BETTER.

Frank C. Simpson Linden Boulevard near 175th Street, St. Albans. Simpson, a janitor returning from the evening shift at a Con Edison facility, was hit by a Dodge Stratus on November 9, 2006.

Jose Mora (left) North Conduit and McKinley Avenues, Cypress Hills. On September 4, 2006, 11-year-old Mora was on his way to the barber for a back-to-school haircut; that week, he was to start the sixth grade at nearby Junior High School 302. He was struck by a Honda while walking his bike across an intersection.

Jonathan Neese South 4th Street and Roebling Street, Williamsburg. On August 12, 2006, Neese, a bike messenger known as "Bronx Jon," was struck by a livery cab while cycling from Brooklyn to Manhattan.

Sam Khaled Hindy (left) Base of the Manhattan Bridge. On November 16, 2007, Hindy was run over after mistakenly entering a Manhattan Bridge lane reserved for cars.

Habian Rodriguez Main Street and Horace Harding Expressway, Flushing. On September 1, 2007, Rodriguez collided with a city bus and died 30 minutes later.

Elizabeth Padilla (left) Fifth Avenue and Prospect Place, Park Slope. Commuting to the Brooklyn Bar Association on June 9, 2005, Padilla swerved to avoid the open door of a parked P.C. Richard's truck. She lost control of her bike and fell underneath the wheels of an ice-cream delivery truck.

Juan Luis Solis East Gun Hill Road and Bouck Avenue, the Bronx. Attempting to pass a double-parked car on June 22, 2007, Solis was struck by a box truck and died of severe head trauma. The truck did not stop.

Jeffrey Moore (left) Chauncey Street and Rockaway Avenue, Bed-Stuy. According to witnesses, on May 29, 2007, Moore was run over (twice) by his girlfriend Jeanine Harrington. She was indicted on charges of murder and criminal possession of a weapon (her Nissan Pathfinder).

Derek Lake Houston Street and La Guardia Place. On June 26, 2006, Lake reportedly skidded on a steel construction plate and was crushed underneath the wheels of a passing truck.

Elijah Armand Wrancher (left) Springfield Boulevard and 130th Avenue, Springfield Gardens. On August 28, 2007, 12-year-old Wrancher attempted to ride his bicycle while holding onto a moving truck. He lost his grip and fell under the truck's rear wheel.

David Smith Sixth Avenue and 36th Street. On December 5, 2007, Smith was biking up Sixth Avenue when the passenger-side door of a parked pickup truck opened unexpectedly. He was knocked into the path of an oncoming truck.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend's baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend's baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend's baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend's baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Fall Fashion Features

The Beefcake in the Backcourt
Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.

 

The Beefcake in the Backcourt
Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.
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