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I recently paid a studio visit to mixed-media artist M P Landis, who inhabits an old candy factory in Clinton Hill. I had never seen a tin façade on anything but ceilings. Here, the original tin skin of the walls and even doors is largely intact.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The industrial elevator has been broken for as long as Michael (who goes professionally by the initials M P) has been here—for the last fourteen years—which means you get to see the different aging patinas as you climb the painted stairs to the fourth floor, where he works.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

There is a lot to take in before you even reach his front door—like the entrance here to his landlady’s apartment with doors from her collection of hundreds she’s amassed through the years.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Here were are inside Michael’s 400-square-foot studio. The sign is from the last show he had at M55 Art in Long Island City in 2009.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I was struck by this fantastic painting that Michael just finished for a show that will be presented in London at the A.K. Lambert Gallery later this year. “I painted this to the music of David S. Ware,” he explains.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

The studio walls are covered with his recent work; select pieces can be found at David Cafiero’s new East Village gallery. Michael’s art is collaborative in that he has done paintings onstage to live music and also works with writers and other visual artists. Jazz musician Marc Ribot was playing the day of my visit.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

I was particularly intrigued by this exquisite series of “Warehouse Drawings,” which he refers to as W.D.’s. These start out as folded pieces of paper that Michael carries around in his pocket, featuring the date and “daily minutiae.” He then paints and draws over them, he explains, “in response to whatever is happening in and outside of my studio.” His W.D. series, he says, “has become my most important body of work. They are artifacts of my process of transforming the overstimulation of modern urban life into something simpler, direct, and emotional, while still showing the layers of the process.” The paintings are numbered in chronological order starting with No. 1, which was created in 1996. “I have made over 5,700 as of today,” Michael wrote in an e-mail on March 5.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Michael showed me how they are made: on rectangular pieces of wood that serve as easels.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This perfect little still life, on a shelf by the window, is composed of rocks Michael found in Fort Greene Park and a piece of painted wood from an art installation. The coiled extension cord, believe it or not, is actually not an art piece.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

This piece is totally fascinating to me for a lot of reasons, but first and foremost because I had no idea you could send a block of wood in the mail and it would actually get delivered. But the story here is that Michael and another artist would send these back and forth to each other as part of an art project with notes on the reverse. Michael will be discussing his practice and conducting a workshop, “Everything Is Teacher: Finding Inspiration Everywhere,” at the Brooklyn Workshop Gallery (393 Hoyt St., nr. 3rd St., Carroll Gardens) March 16 and 17 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Photo: Wendy Goodman

Craig Murphey (left) Ten Eyck Street and Union Avenue, Williamsburg. Early in the morning of October 18, 2007, Murphey was biking home from escorting his date to her South Williamsburg apartment. According to police reports, Murphey attempted to outrun a gas truck turning left on Ten Eyck Street. His pelvis shattered on impact, and he was pronounced dead at the scene. In his honor, over 40 friends have since received tattoos that read BE BETTER.

Frank C. Simpson Linden Boulevard near 175th Street, St. Albans. Simpson, a janitor returning from the evening shift at a Con Edison facility, was hit by a Dodge Stratus on November 9, 2006.

Jose Mora (left) North Conduit and McKinley Avenues, Cypress Hills. On September 4, 2006, 11-year-old Mora was on his way to the barber for a back-to-school haircut; that week, he was to start the sixth grade at nearby Junior High School 302. He was struck by a Honda while walking his bike across an intersection.

Jonathan Neese South 4th Street and Roebling Street, Williamsburg. On August 12, 2006, Neese, a bike messenger known as “Bronx Jon,” was struck by a livery cab while cycling from Brooklyn to Manhattan.

Sam Khaled Hindy (left) Base of the Manhattan Bridge. On November 16, 2007, Hindy was run over after mistakenly entering a Manhattan Bridge lane reserved for cars.

Habian Rodriguez Main Street and Horace Harding Expressway, Flushing. On September 1, 2007, Rodriguez collided with a city bus and died 30 minutes later.

Elizabeth Padilla (left) Fifth Avenue and Prospect Place, Park Slope. Commuting to the Brooklyn Bar Association on June 9, 2005, Padilla swerved to avoid the open door of a parked P.C. Richard’s truck. She lost control of her bike and fell underneath the wheels of an ice-cream delivery truck.

Juan Luis Solis East Gun Hill Road and Bouck Avenue, the Bronx. Attempting to pass a double-parked car on June 22, 2007, Solis was struck by a box truck and died of severe head trauma. The truck did not stop.

Jeffrey Moore (left) Chauncey Street and Rockaway Avenue, Bed-Stuy. According to witnesses, on May 29, 2007, Moore was run over (twice) by his girlfriend Jeanine Harrington. She was indicted on charges of murder and criminal possession of a weapon (her Nissan Pathfinder).

Derek Lake Houston Street and La Guardia Place. On June 26, 2006, Lake reportedly skidded on a steel construction plate and was crushed underneath the wheels of a passing truck.

Elijah Armand Wrancher (left) Springfield Boulevard and 130th Avenue, Springfield Gardens. On August 28, 2007, 12-year-old Wrancher attempted to ride his bicycle while holding onto a moving truck. He lost his grip and fell under the truck’s rear wheel.

David Smith Sixth Avenue and 36th Street. On December 5, 2007, Smith was biking up Sixth Avenue when the passenger-side door of a parked pickup truck opened unexpectedly. He was knocked into the path of an oncoming truck.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Fall Fashion Features

The Beefcake in the Backcourt
Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.

 

The Beefcake in the Backcourt
Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.
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