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The Mondrian Soho's newly installed wall of photographs.  

1,200 Square Feet of Sol Lewitt
Should you be walking down Lafayette Street or visiting the Mondrian Soho this holiday season, take a look at the hotel’s newly installed wall of photographs, a collection of Sol LeWitt photographs taken in 1979 and never before exhibited in New York. The permanent exhibition, arranged in collaboration with the Paula Cooper Gallery, features 120 images of the Lower East Side, presenting the neighborhood’s Jewish heritage overlaid with modern urbanity: graffiti, garbage, and grime. For the installation, they’ve been arranged in a grid and printed on vinyl to cover the hotel’s outer lobby wall, measuring a grand 20 feet high by 60 feet wide (150 Lafayette St., nr. Grand St.; paulacoopergallery.com).

Everyone’s an Auteur
Recognizing the profound changes the Internet has wrought on systems of film distribution—and therefore on the creation of cinema itself—the Museum of Arts and Design has installed an interactive video bank in its sixth floor education center, for visitors to see for themselves how one person’s consumption can now effect an entire industry. Titled “The User: The New Auteur,” the exhibition will allow patrons to track their video choices and see how their patterns of consumption align with others, as well as to create their own video playlists, becoming their own editors and directors (2 Columbus Circle, nr. Eighth Ave.; 212-299-7777; Tu, W, Sa, Su, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.; Th, F, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; $15, $12 students and seniors; madmuseum.org; through March 4).

Peeping East Hampton
The 27th annual East Hampton House Tour begins this Friday with a cocktail party at the historic Charles H. Adams House, a Queen Anne–style home by the same architect who designed Carnegie Hall. The tour continues Saturday with a stop at the Adams House and four more homes that represent the diversity of architecture found in the area: a Federal-style home built for a prominent whaler (which still has an actual whale tooth embedded in a banister); an 1894 home with its own “windpump” plumbing system; a contemporary shingle-style home, the pure expression of Hamptons architecture; and the Arc House, a concrete-and-glass loftlike home buried half-underground (101 Main St., nr. Davids Ln., East Hampton; 631-324-6850; cocktail party and tour $150; tour only $65 in advance, $75 day of; easthamptonhistory.org).


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