Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Design News

ShareThis

One of Nightwood's well-worn refurbished pieces.  

A Flea Favorite Puts Down Roots
Nightwood (nightwoodny.com), opening this Saturday on Grand Street in Williamsburg, has a trashy backstory: In 2007, rather than pay for furniture, owners Nadia Yaron and Myriah Scruggs began picking throwaway chairs and tables off the curb and refurbishing them, gradually honing their skills as designers and craftsmen. These days, they make things from scratch—they’re too afraid of bedbugs to grab stuff directly off the street—but they’ve maintained the furniture’s warm, lived-in aesthetic by using salvaged wood for their inlaid tables, cabinets, and shelving. They’ve had a booth at the Brooklyn Flea from the very start and a pop-up shop in Downtown Brooklyn for close to a year, but the Williamsburg location finally gives them a permanent home (111 Grand St., nr. Berry St; 646-361-5031; opening reception noon–7 p.m.).

Sotheby’s for Free
Whether or not you’ll ever wave around an auction paddle, you can still ogle the items up for bid at Sotheby’s Important 20th Century Design sale, taking place June 15 at its York Avenue gallery. For the four days prior, the auction house will display a literal wealth of works, including a dining table by Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann that was once in Andy Warhol’s collection, a striking “Ananas et Grenades” plafonnier (that’s a ceiling light with pineapples and pomegranates) by René Lalique, as well as rare lighting pieces from Tiffany Studios. (1334 York Ave., nr. 72nd St.; 212-606-7000; 6/11 and 6/13, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; 6/12, 1–5 p.m.; 6/14, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.)

Hello Again, High Line
This week’s New York has all the details about the new section of the High Line, which opened to the public today. Among the highlights: Sarah Sze’s Still Life with Landscape (Model for a Habitat), a spacey stainless-steel arbor at the beginning of the extension, at 20th Street; La Newyorkina’s Mexican chocolate and horchata ice pops; the Viewing Spur, which gives you a bird’s-eye view of 26th Street’s gallery scene; and the wildflower field starting at 27th Street—not for those with allergies.


Related:

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising