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Photos from Out of Order: Used Office Desks and Used Office Plants for Sale, 2008-2013, an installation at the BRIC Biennial: Volume 1.   

The Art of Losing
On Thursday, December 18, from 6 to 8 p.m., Printed Matter (195 Tenth Ave., nr. 22nd St.; 212-925-0325) will host Penelope Umbrico for the launch of her new book, Out of Order (RVB Books), which depicts the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis through found images of disused office furniture for sale online. Along with these symbols of corporate insolvency, the book includes a foldout list of the 489 banks that went bankrupt between 2008 and 2013. Umbrico will project images from the book on the walls of Printed Matter during the event, at which she will also give a brief presentation. The event is free and open to the public.

Floating On
As part of its Migrating Forms series, on December 18 at 6:45 p.m., BAMcinématek (30 Lafayette Ave., at Flatbush Ave., Ft. Greene; 718-636-4100) will screen a short film by artist pair Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe that was originally presented at the artists’ 2014 exhibition at Marlborough Chelsea. The Floating Chain brings Freeman and Lowe’s well-known installation work to the big screen, depicting, in a continuous camera flow, disparate scenes such as an inner-city swap meet and a 1960s hotel lounge. Freeman will be there to introduce the presentation. General adult admission is $14. For tickets, click here.

A New Kind of Dance
The traveling dance exhibition “AUNTSforcamera” is at the New Museum (235 Bowery, nr. Prince St; 212-219-1222) until February 15. The production of AUNTSforcamera began in September with a weeklong open studio at the New Museum organized by dance cooperative Aunts. There, nine artists each created original dance-for-camera works to be reproduced across the globe. After a monthlong run in an Amsterdam nightclub, AUNTSforcamera returns to the New Museum with the same material, now dispersed throughout various “non-gallery” spaces. While the program includes a map, its organizers are “also interested in how the work might sneak up on visitors,” says Travis Chamberlain, associate curator of performance at New Museum. The pieces include an interactive video installation of aerial footage shot by a drone and a video game that teaches the original Harlem Shake. Unlike the previous installment, the New Museum program includes a series of nine artist-led tours.


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