the national interest

Here Are the 4 Different Ways Democrats Can Save Obamacare

Democratic leaders in Congress defending Obamacare.

The Republican campaign to discredit the Affordable Care Act is a catastrophic success. Republicans have denounced the law for shortcomings that their own plans would all exacerbate, and have taken advantage of widespread confusion about what the law does and whom it benefits — a posture that works only as long as Republicans can avoid responsibility for the status quo. Democrats have the chance to defend and safeguard Obamacare’s successes if they leverage this Republican vulnerability. In fact, they have four chances.

The next phase of the fight over American health care will be confusing. It will unfold over numerous votes and many months (or, more likely, years). But every strategy involves using the GOP’s political weakness against it with the goal of getting the best possible outcome for the people helped by Obamacare.

1. Defeat repeal and delay. Republicans have a two-step plan. First, they will vote to defund Obamacare through a budget-reconciliation bill that can’t be filibustered. Then their replacement plan will be voted on later.

The repeal vote is the easiest step in the Republican plan, but it’s still not very easy. Republicans will repeal the law and delay the effects of the repeal for a long period (the most current reporting suggests three years). A vote to repeal Obamacare without clarity about its replacement will threaten massive chaos in the health-care market. Not only will millions of Americans lose their access to medical care but, even worse (from a Republican perspective), doctors, hospitals, and insurers will face the risk of massive losses. Several Republicans have threatened to oppose a bill that repeals Obamacare without simultaneously replacing it, and the party can only afford to lose two votes.

Last week, Senate Republicans started bleeding votes, as some half-dozen of their members indicated deep reservations about repeal-and-delay. GOP leaders yanked them back into line on a procedural vote by promising that the deadline for the real repeal vote could be extended. But there remains a real chance the repeal strategy could collapse at step one.

2. Negotiate for minimal changes. Republicans hope that defunding Obamacare on a delay will pressure Democrats into giving them cover for the kinds of unpopular changes Republicans want to make to the system — which means letting insurers sell skimpy plans, with lower subsidies, creating sky-high premiums and deductibles that leave medical coverage far less affordable to people who are either poor or sick. The expiration of the phase-out will be a cliff. Trump has said that he thinks he can force at least eight Democrats, which is the number his party needs to write a new health-care bill, to support his plan by convincing voters to blame them if Obamacare ends.

But this is preposterous. Voters always hold the governing party accountable for bad outcomes. Remember, many of the people who would lose their care voted for Trump and expect him to protect or even strengthen their insurance. Assuming repeal-and-delay passes, Democrats should treat it as if the Republican government has set off a time bomb that would blow up its majority.

Of course, expiration of Obamacare without any plan to replace it would create a humanitarian catastrophe as well. So if Republicans want to agree to some package of small fixes that preserves the law’s main accomplishments, Democrats might take such a deal. Then, basically, Obamacare will have been rebranded as Trumpcare. A handful of hard-core anti-government ideologues on the right would howl. But, given that vanishingly few Republicans have any idea what Obamacare does, they could easily be convinced that Trumpcare is amazing, even if it is 95 percent the same as Obamacare.

3. Push for extension. Assuming steps one and two fail, and no deal can be struck, at some point, the deadline for Obamacare extension will approach, perhaps at the end of 2019. Republicans will not want to head into the 2020 elections having presided over a catastrophic failure, with news coverage of suffering, death, and failing hospitals and insurers. Trump would have broken his promise to replace Obamacare with a terrific alternative that takes care of everybody. Lobbyists for insurers, doctors, and hospitals will exert overwhelming pressure to simply extend Obamacare’s deadline, which could be done by the same majority vote that “repealed” the law. The extensions would continue until Trump leaves office.

4. Repeal the repeal. If all the above steps fail, there is one final recourse. Assume Obamacare is repealed and no replacement emerges. (Or perhaps the “replacement” is a handful of hoary Republican measures, like Health Savings Accounts, that do little or nothing to cover people who can’t afford insurance.) Either way, Democrats will have a clear path forward to undoing whatever Republicans do to their system. The disaster of repeal-without-replace could easily be broad enough to power the kind of anti-incumbent wave that produced the last Democratic majority, in 2006 and 2008. Possibly, Democrats will have to wait longer than until 2020 to regain their control of government.

But the legislative dynamic will have changed for good. It’s important to recall that the filibuster is the reason health-care reform was out of reach for decades. Democrats could have passed health-care reform under Bill Clinton, or possibly earlier, if not for the Senate’s 60-vote requirement. They finally overcame that threshold in 2009 by mustering 60 Senate votes. Republicans might defund their bill with 50 votes, but they won’t have 60 votes to eliminate the insurance regulations it created. That means Democrats can pass reform again with only 50 Senate votes. That opportunity will come. And if Trump’s government screws up badly enough, it will probably arrive sooner rather than later.

4 Different Ways Democrats Can Save Obamacare
the national interest

Here Are the 4 Different Ways Democrats Can Save Obamacare

Democratic leaders in Congress defending Obamacare.

The Republican campaign to discredit the Affordable Care Act is a catastrophic success. Republicans have denounced the law for shortcomings that their own plans would all exacerbate, and have taken advantage of widespread confusion about what the law does and whom it benefits — a posture that works only as long as Republicans can avoid responsibility for the status quo. Democrats have the chance to defend and safeguard Obamacare’s successes if they leverage this Republican vulnerability. In fact, they have four chances.

The next phase of the fight over American health care will be confusing. It will unfold over numerous votes and many months (or, more likely, years). But every strategy involves using the GOP’s political weakness against it with the goal of getting the best possible outcome for the people helped by Obamacare.

1. Defeat repeal and delay. Republicans have a two-step plan. First, they will vote to defund Obamacare through a budget-reconciliation bill that can’t be filibustered. Then their replacement plan will be voted on later.

The repeal vote is the easiest step in the Republican plan, but it’s still not very easy. Republicans will repeal the law and delay the effects of the repeal for a long period (the most current reporting suggests three years). A vote to repeal Obamacare without clarity about its replacement will threaten massive chaos in the health-care market. Not only will millions of Americans lose their access to medical care but, even worse (from a Republican perspective), doctors, hospitals, and insurers will face the risk of massive losses. Several Republicans have threatened to oppose a bill that repeals Obamacare without simultaneously replacing it, and the party can only afford to lose two votes.

Last week, Senate Republicans started bleeding votes, as some half-dozen of their members indicated deep reservations about repeal-and-delay. GOP leaders yanked them back into line on a procedural vote by promising that the deadline for the real repeal vote could be extended. But there remains a real chance the repeal strategy could collapse at step one.

2. Negotiate for minimal changes. Republicans hope that defunding Obamacare on a delay will pressure Democrats into giving them cover for the kinds of unpopular changes Republicans want to make to the system — which means letting insurers sell skimpy plans, with lower subsidies, creating sky-high premiums and deductibles that leave medical coverage far less affordable to people who are either poor or sick. The expiration of the phase-out will be a cliff. Trump has said that he thinks he can force at least eight Democrats, which is the number his party needs to write a new health-care bill, to support his plan by convincing voters to blame them if Obamacare ends.

But this is preposterous. Voters always hold the governing party accountable for bad outcomes. Remember, many of the people who would lose their care voted for Trump and expect him to protect or even strengthen their insurance. Assuming repeal-and-delay passes, Democrats should treat it as if the Republican government has set off a time bomb that would blow up its majority.

Of course, expiration of Obamacare without any plan to replace it would create a humanitarian catastrophe as well. So if Republicans want to agree to some package of small fixes that preserves the law’s main accomplishments, Democrats might take such a deal. Then, basically, Obamacare will have been rebranded as Trumpcare. A handful of hard-core anti-government ideologues on the right would howl. But, given that vanishingly few Republicans have any idea what Obamacare does, they could easily be convinced that Trumpcare is amazing, even if it is 95 percent the same as Obamacare.

3. Push for extension. Assuming steps one and two fail, and no deal can be struck, at some point, the deadline for Obamacare extension will approach, perhaps at the end of 2019. Republicans will not want to head into the 2020 elections having presided over a catastrophic failure, with news coverage of suffering, death, and failing hospitals and insurers. Trump would have broken his promise to replace Obamacare with a terrific alternative that takes care of everybody. Lobbyists for insurers, doctors, and hospitals will exert overwhelming pressure to simply extend Obamacare’s deadline, which could be done by the same majority vote that “repealed” the law. The extensions would continue until Trump leaves office.

4. Repeal the repeal. If all the above steps fail, there is one final recourse. Assume Obamacare is repealed and no replacement emerges. (Or perhaps the “replacement” is a handful of hoary Republican measures, like Health Savings Accounts, that do little or nothing to cover people who can’t afford insurance.) Either way, Democrats will have a clear path forward to undoing whatever Republicans do to their system. The disaster of repeal-without-replace could easily be broad enough to power the kind of anti-incumbent wave that produced the last Democratic majority, in 2006 and 2008. Possibly, Democrats will have to wait longer than until 2020 to regain their control of government.

But the legislative dynamic will have changed for good. It’s important to recall that the filibuster is the reason health-care reform was out of reach for decades. Democrats could have passed health-care reform under Bill Clinton, or possibly earlier, if not for the Senate’s 60-vote requirement. They finally overcame that threshold in 2009 by mustering 60 Senate votes. Republicans might defund their bill with 50 votes, but they won’t have 60 votes to eliminate the insurance regulations it created. That means Democrats can pass reform again with only 50 Senate votes. That opportunity will come. And if Trump’s government screws up badly enough, it will probably arrive sooner rather than later.

4 Different Ways Democrats Can Save Obamacare
THE FEED

But students who don’t go to John Hopkins will still need the government’s help

Good for Bloomberg, but its wearying that our solution to increasing access and dealing with student debt is having an insanely rich alum, a solution that is not easily at hand for the institutions where most of our students gohttps://t.co/8RjoRBOxz5
@donmoyn

John Hopkins and its future students hit the billionaire alumnus jackpot as Bloomberg makes record-setting donation

Former New York mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced Sunday he is giving a record $1.8 billion to Johns Hopkins University to support student financial aid at his alma mater and make its admissions process “forever need-blind.”


The gift, believed to be the largest private donation in modern times to higher education, is a landmark in a growing national movement to make elite universities more accessible to students from low-to-middle income families.


It will enable the private research university in Baltimore to eliminate loans from financial aid packages for incoming students starting next fall, expand grants for those in financial need and even provide relief to many current undergraduates who had previously taken out federal loans to pay their bills.

“Paradise will come back, but it can’t be what it once was. It shouldn’t be.”

People prepared. Fire prevention officials planned. They drilled. They worked with homeowners. They invented fire-safe councils and Fire on the Ridge and sent fire prevention officials to schools via a program called Fire Pals. They raised money to keep fire lookouts open when the state said it wouldn’t.


Eventually, geography and topography proved to be the trap everyone thought it was.


Paradise and Magalia sit on top of a pine-studded ridge between several canyons. There are very few subdivisions. Instead, homes are built one at a time and tucked into trees. Fly over the area in a helicopter and those trees stand like matchsticks surrounding well-hidden homes.


Most cities have grass. Paradise’s predominant ground covering is pine needles — extremely flammable pine needles.


It wasn’t a well-planned city, but rather a village that grew into a city. The grid pattern of Paradise’s roads is haphazard. There are few arterials. Instead, there are two-lane roads without much connectivity. When people tried to evacuate in a flash, those bottlenecks were pronounced. Several people died in their cars, trapped by gridlock.


The large roads leading out of town aren’t large. Only Skyway is two lanes in both directions. Two summers ago, the town decided to turn Skyway from four lanes to two in the downtown area to “calm” traffic and make things more quaint. That couldn’t have helped the escape.

For another perspective on the devastating speed and reach of the Camp fire, have a look at this interactive infographic timeline from the New York Times

Photo: Screenshot from ‘Hell on Earth’: The First 12 Hours of California’s Deadliest Wildfire, published Sunday by the New York Times

Even when they can find what’s left of the Camp fire victims, some remains may never be identified

“We’re finding remains in various states,” Butte County Sheriff Kory Honea said. “I suspect there are some that will have been completely consumed.”


Search-and-rescue teams can take hours collecting a single victim – trying to make sure bones or other body parts aren’t left behind for relatives and friends to find when they return.


Still, “there is certainly the unfortunate possibility that even after we’ve searched an area, once people get back in there, it’s possible that human remains could be found,” Honea said. “I know that’s a very difficult thing to think about, but that’s the difficult situation we find ourselves in today.” …


The sheer heat generated by California’s deadliest wildfire will complicate matters. At its peak, the inferno may have reached temperatures exceeding 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. It could be impossible in some cases to obtain DNA samples from the victims, thwarting what is often the ID method employed when all else fails. “The severity, the blaze, the burning – who knows what DNA is left?” said Colleen Fitzpatrick, founder of an Orange County consulting company called Identifinders International. “You need a certain amount of DNA.”


From the LA Times’ must-read, absolutely terrifying hour-by-hour narrative of the Camp fire

The fire caught up to [34-year-old Nichole] Jolly on Pearson Road, blasting her car with heat. She reached for the stethoscope slung around her neck and flinched as the metal burned. Her steering wheel was melting — the plastic stuck to her hands.


As her car caught fire and began to fill with black smoke, she called her husband. “Run,” he told her.


Jolly fled for safety to the car ahead of hers, but it too was abandoned. She ran on.


The rubber on her shoes melted into the asphalt. The back of her scrubs caught fire, blistering her legs. She tried another car, but it wasn’t moving.


“I can’t die like this,” she told herself. “There’s no way I’m going to die sitting in a car. I have to run.”


Jolly plunged into the smoke, now blinding, and ran with her hands stretched out in front of her. She hit firm, hot metal. A firetruck.


Two firefighters lifted her in and radioed for help, pleading for a water drop. The crackled response came back: “Impossible.”

A 2020 vision

Worth noting that Amendment 4, which passed at the same election, enfranchised 1.4 million Floridians, which is about 140 times the margin in the Senate race. https://t.co/4hMy7Q68RO
@joshchafetz

Meanwhile in the only remaining Senate race, a small opening for the Democrats

Last year, in another runoff special Senate election in Alabama, a surge of African-American turnout led to a stunning victory for Democrat Doug Jones over Republican Roy Moore, who had been accused of sexually molesting and assaulting teenage girls. The allegations gave voters in the state who don’t typically support Democrats something to vote against.


[Mike] Espy, a 64-year-old former congressman and agriculture secretary, now hopes [Republican Cindy] Hyde-Smith’s comments [about attending a public hanging and suppressing liberal voters] will similarly turbocharge turnout and tilt voters in the November 27 runoff against her. …


Still, to win the Senate runoff, Espy must walk a tightrope, overperforming among African-American voters and college students in the state’s urban areas in a runoff being held on the Tuesday after the Thanksgiving weekend while also winning a share of voters who typically back Republicans. It’s difficult to do both.

Nelson has conceded the Florida Senate race

Bill Nelson in his concession: “We must end all forms of voter suppression, make it easier for Americans to vote, and honor the ideal that we are governed by the majority and not by the minority rule.” pic.twitter.com/lxhwg7W7du
@kylegriffin1

One likely reason so many people are still unaccounted for in the Northern California fire zone (but may not actually be “missing”)

[On Butte County’s “raw” list of the unaccounted for], many of the people whose ages are listed are elderly - reflecting the area’s popularity as a retirement hotspot. Paradise, the town in Butte County that was devastated by the wildfire, has an estimated population of about 27,000. According to the latest census, about a quarter of those are aged 65 or over.


Eric Reinbold, the chief of police in Paradise, said the list’s demographics underscore the difficulties in evacuating older residents in rapid emergency situations.


“Like any community, we had elderly folks and some of them gave up driving or can’t drive,” Chief Reinbold said.


If they did make it out, older residents may also be less likely to have access to the internet or other mobile communications to contact people they know.

An unparalleled popular-vote pushback on the president

Seems likely Democrats will eventually get up to about 60 million total votes for the House once unprocessed ballots from California are tallied. Maybe a bit more (~61M?) based on what’s left in other states. Those are similar numbers to what recent GOP presidential candidates have received.


Trump got 63M votes, Romney 61M, McCain 60M. Democratic votes for the House this year should be very close to that range. There’s not any precedent for an opposition party coming this close to matching the president’s vote total from 2 years earlier. The closest to an exception was when Democratic House candidates in 1970 got 92% of Nixon’s vote total from 1968.


Of course, this reflects three things we already knew:


1) Trump was elected despite losing the popular vote;

2) Democrats’s won by a big margin this year and

3) Turnout was VERY high.


But Trump is a very unpopular president, and I don’t think that’s totally sunk in yet in how he’s covered.


About 60 million people turned out to vote for Democrats for the House this year. That is a **crazy** number. (Republicans got 45M votes in the 2010 wave.) And this was sort of missed. Why so many stories about Trump voters in truck stops and not so many about “the resistance”?

Nate Silver, via Twitter thread

As expected, the manual recount hasn’t saved Nelson in Florida — but a better Broward ballot design might have (if he had taken 70% of those missing votes)

Post-manual-recount Florida Senate **official** election results: Rick Scott (R) defeats Bill Nelson (D) by 10,033 votes.


The manual recount actually shifted the margin by 2,570 votes, which is more than twice as many as the previous record recount shift this century. The fact that Florida is a huge state helps, but that’s certainly notable.


25,543 fewer votes were cast in the Florida Senate race than governor’s race in Broward County. It’s possible—though by no means certain—that bad ballot design cost Bill Nelson his seat.

Nathaniel Rakich, in a series of tweets

And just courting more failure anyway

To be clear: The only thing funnier/more tragic than the Browns trying to hire Condoleezza Rice as head coach is that they’ll likely be turned down by Condoleezza Rice
@DavidSRudin

Fake-out news instead of progress in Cleveland

A principal concern that I have about this is that the Browns, whom Condoleezza Rice and I both love, will use her to satisfy the Rooney Rule and will fail to consider any other black candidates for the head coaching job.


John Dorsey, the Browns general manager, did say that he’d consider a woman for the job. Leaking that Rice would be the first such candidate underscores what a joke that was. This is throwing table scraps at feminist goals, using that promise for P.R. value rather than progress.


Rice, like me, is a Browns fan. Has been since her days growing up in Alabama. Our differing politics aside, she could possibly bring something to the organization in another capacity. But there are women now coaching football who could use this interviewing experience.


The Browns have a promising rookie quarterback, at last, as well as other young stars who need the best coaching that you can find. Dorsey does not appear to be focused fully on that mission. Considering Condi Rice is something Trump would do if he were running the Browns.


Jamil Smith, via Twitter

The canary-county in the GOP’s coal mine?

“Sitting back in the 1960s, I would never have believed this would happen,” said Stuart K. Spencer, a party strategist who spent more than half a century ushering Republicans, including President Reagan, into office.


But noting the extensive demographic and political changes that have taken place [in California] — especially over the last two decades — “it’s pretty understandable,” Spencer said. …


It’s the Republican wipeout in Orange County, a wellspring of conservatism that nourished generations of state and national party leaders, that stands as a shock. Many never thought they would see a day when its expansive suburban tracts were anything but flaming Republican red.


“A huge deal,” said Eileen Padberg, a veteran GOP strategist who recently shed her affiliation out of frustration with Trump and the national party.


Likening the GOP’s hegemony to a dictatorship, Padberg said that for as long as she could recall, “If you wanted contracts, if you wanted a job, you had to be a Republican.”


But, she said, as Orange County changed — growing younger, more diverse, more socially tolerant — most of its Republican lawmakers failed to change with it. “They focused only on their right-wing base,” Padberg said, “and didn’t do a good job problem-solving.”

Why rake when you can vacuum

Photo: Finnish photographer Pyry Luminen shows President Trump a more efficient way to rake the forest floor to prevent fires ("Just an ordinary day in the Finnish forest ~ Ihan normipäivä suomalaisessa metsässä" — @pyryluminen/Twitter)

Is this real life?

The Cleveland Browns would like to interview former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice for their head coaching job, a league source told @AdamSchefter. https://t.co/0qTspLz7FE

@SportsCenter

But still plenty of red in Orange County’s new blue

Going into 2016, the GOP had carried Orange County in every presidential race since 1936 and held four House districts there. Then Clinton won it by 8% and Dems [have now won] every House district that includes Orange County.


On other hand, Orange County voters still open to GOP down-ballot, though barely: GOP still ahead in the two state Senate seats it was defending in Orange (though its margin in #SD34 is melting), and Don Barnes won an important sheriff’s election with immigration and ethics in backdrop.


My usual point: given big scandals in sheriff’s office, allegations of abusive detention, and *huge* immigration stakes, fact that Barnes appears to have done better than (all?) other Republicans running countywide signals work still to be done to make these issues and races salient.


Why I say sheriff’s race was important for immigration in OC: the department has been actively opposing, resisting CA’s “sanctuary” law. [There have been many] organizing successes in making such stuff salient — but also some cases (OC, Tampa…) of it not quite breaking through.

Daniel Nichanian, via Twitter thread

Furthermore

The California GOP’s collapse in Orange County wasn’t limited to House races. Right now Gavin Newsom is losing the county by 1.2 points, and may end up winning it. Jerry Brown lost it by 11 points. https://t.co/YlrxaMjB1S
@daveweigel

The GOP-cut

The Trump-GOP corporate tax cut was a missile aimed at high-tax/high service blue states like New York / California / New Jersey.


One result:


• Republicans now down to one House seat in New Jersey.

• Dems routed GOP in California’s Orange County.

• Big Dem pickups in New York, even in rightish congressional districts.


Multiple causes here, obviously, but don’t underestimate this one.

Nick Confessore

Chalk up another House seat — and a complete sweep — for the Dems in Reagan Country (the midterm wave now stands at +37)

Breaking: Gil Cisneros has defeated Republican Young Kim in the 39th Congressional District. His victory means the longtime conservative stronghold of Orange County will be represented entirely by Democrats in the House next session. https://t.co/VJVI3YXMLq
@latimes

Trump refused to listen to Khashoggi’s murder, and still doesn’t (want to) know about MBS’s involvement

Trump also suggested he may just live with it, even if Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman misled him, because “we do have an ally and I want to stick with an ally that in many ways has been very good.”


“I don’t know,” he told Chris Wallace on “Fox News Sunday.” “Who could really know? But I can say this, he’s got many people now that say he had no knowledge.”


Trump said he had refused to listen to a tape of the killing shared by Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.


“Because it’s a suffering tape, it’s a terrible tape,” he said. “I’ve been fully briefed on it. There’s no reason for me to hear it. … It was very violent, very vicious and terrible.”

Now nearly 1,300 people are unaccounted for in Camp fire (and the death toll has risen to 76)

Even as hundreds of searchers sift through the rubble in the town of Paradise[, California] looking for the dead, nearly 1,300 people remain unaccounted for more than a week after the fire sparked in Butte County, Sheriff Kory Honea announced Saturday night. Authorities stressed that the long roster does not mean they believe all those people are missing.


Honea pleaded with fire evacuees Saturday to review the list of those reported as unreachable by family and friends and call if they are safe. Deputies have located hundreds of people to date, but the overall number keeps growing because they are adding more names, including those from the disaster’s chaotic early hours, Honea said. …


Rain was forecast for midweek, which could help firefighters but also complicate the search for remains. The National Weather Service warned that on Sunday, the area could get 20 mph sustained winds and 40 mph gusts, which could make it hard for crews to continue making progress against the blaze.


ride sharing apps
ride sharing apps
Lyft Does More to Woo Drivers as It Preps to IPO
As both Lyft and Uber prepare to go public in 2019, both companies will be fighting for drivers just as they fight for passengers.
#metoo
#metoo
The GOP Thinks #MeToo Is a Chance to Exploit the ‘Biased’ Press
But their attempts just show how much they get wrong about journalism.

First responders have brought thousands of pets rescued from the Camp fire to California animal shelters (including many that suffered burns) — but this dog is still with his person

Photo: Jason House attempts to put a respirator mask on his dog Rowland at the "Wallywood" evacuee encampment in a Walmart parking lot in Chico, California on Saturday. More than 1,000 people remain listed as missing in the worst-ever wildfire to hit the US state. (Josh Edelson/ AFP/Getty Images)

Stacey Abrams’s plan to fight for Georgia’s democracy in court

Abrams said the [new federal] lawsuit, which will fall under the umbrella of a new organization called Fair Fight Georgia, will look toward improving the state’s election system prior to municipal elections in 2019 and the 2020 presidential election. Fair Fight may also push for legislative changes at the Capitol, and Abrams said it will hold the state accountable for running elections fairly.


“We have to consider all the pieces that go into voter suppression and diminishing the ability of voters to cast their ballots,” she said. “And that means looking at the staffing and sourcing of polling stations, making sure that there are an adequate number of machines, making certain that poll workers who are often volunteers aren’t judging whether or not someone gets to vote based on how many pieces of paper they have left.”


As for whether she will challenge U.S. Sen. David Perdue in 2020 or seek another bid for governor in four years, Abrams is mum. But she is confident her legal challenges will help continue to expand Georgia’s electorate.


“We know that over the next two years there will be new people who will find themselves energized by politics,” she said. “And I think what we can do in 2020 is absolutely complete the transformation that started this year. It won’t only be at the top of the ticket, but also down the ticket.”