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Home > Restaurants > Aburiya Kinnosuke

Aburiya Kinnosuke

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

213 E. 45th St., New York, NY 10017 40.7526 -73.972738
nr. Third Ave.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-867-5454 Send to Phone

  • Cuisine: Japanese/Sushi
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    8 out of 10

      |  

    7 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Jeremy Liebman

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Official Website

aburiyakinnosuke.com

Hours

Mon-Fri, 11:30am-2:30pm and 5:30pm-midnight; Sat, 5:30pm-midnight; Sun, 5:30pm-11:30pm

Nearby Subway Stops

4, 5, 6, 7, S at Grand Central-42nd St.

Prices

$8-$55

Payment Methods

American Express, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Business Lunch
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Lunch
  • Private Dining/Party Space
  • Prix-Fixe

Alcohol

  • Sake and Soju
  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

There are two ways to dine in this spiffy Japanese restaurant: in private, like an international tycoon furtively conducting business behind the curtains of a sequestered nook, or in public, at the congenial counter by the robata grill, where poker-faced cooks painstakingly monitor the progress of the skewers and planks they prop amid the embers. As at Kinnosuke’s sister restaurant, Yakitori Totto, there’s plenty of grilled chicken parts, and even more variations on a freshly-made-tofu theme—soothing yuba and greens in a subtle broth, and a black-sesame-tofu special chilled and presented like pot de crème. But here, diners have the option of grilling their own food on small contraptions conveyed to their tables, and the affordable small-plates menu is more extensive. Delicious chicken meatballs figure prominently in both restaurants; here, they’re more like tiny meat loaves, cooked and served on weathered wooden peels.

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