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Atoboy

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

43 E. 28th St, New York, NY 10016 40.743663 -73.984537
nr. Park Ave. S.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
646-476-7217 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Korean
  • Price Range: $$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: ***

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Photo by Jemma Hinkly

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Official Website

atoboynyc.com

Hours

Mon-Fri, noon-2pm and 5:30pm-10pm; Sat, 5:30pm-10pm; Sun, closed

Nearby Subway Stops

N, R at 28th St.; 6 at 33rd St.

Prices

Dinner: $36 prix-fixe; Lunch: $20

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Hot Spot
  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef
  • Prix-Fixe
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Beer and Wine Only
  • Sake and Soju

Reservations

Accepted/Not Necessary

Profile

The radical concept behind Atoboy is to offer its customers the opportunity to build a three-course meal around the typically free Korean side dishes called banchan, but — and here’s the radical part — they charge you $42 for the privilege. To be fair, these aren’t the plates of pickled vegetables and tiny fermented fish you get on 32nd Street or in Flushing. Rather, they’re little marvels of perfection, like corn leavened with Taleggio, bacon, and soybean paste; octopus cut into precise nuggets, dusted in cornstarch, fried, and plated like a wagon circle around a chorizo-and-kimchee centerpiece; and fat fingers of fried chicken encased in crisp tempura shells on a slick of ­peanut-y sauce. Chef-partner Junghyun Park worked at the fine-dining Korean restaurant Jungsik, and his approach combines Western ingredients and techniques with the flavors he grew up eating. The concrete-clad room is spare with neat rows of tables set with copper buckets for storing napkins and chopsticks. And the service, led by the chef’s wife and partner, Ellia Park, is polished and smart.

Ideal Meal

French beans with smoked eel, sunchoke, chicken. 

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