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Home > Restaurants > Bar Bolonat

Bar Bolonat

611 Hudson St., New York, NY 10014 40.737549 -74.005734
at W. 12th St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-390-1545 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Mediterranean, Middle Eastern
  • Price Range: $$$

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  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review

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Official Website

barbolonatny.com

Hours

Mon-Thu, 5:30pm-10:30pm; Fri-Sat, 5:30pm-11pm; Sun, closed

Nearby Subway Stops

L at Eighth Ave.; 1, 2, 3 at 14th St.

Prices

$15-$31

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Bar Scene
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Hot Spot
  • Notable Chef
  • Private Dining/Party Space
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

Bar Bolonat, which opened not long ago in the West Village, is another new expansion project by a talented downtown chef, although on a more modest scale than Schenker’s at the Gander and with slightly more uplifting results. Einat Admony has specialized, first at the great falafel shack Taïm, then at Balaboosta in Nolita, in ­translating her own elegant brand of Israeli cooking for a wider New York audience. Her latest restaurant, which occupies an awkward corner space on Hudson Street, seems to be designed as a slightly racier alternative to the other two. The bar serves colorful mixology creations with names like Shiksa and Saz-Arak, and the bar tables are set close together on a floor covered in polished concrete. Dinner is accompanied by a thumping, clubby soundtrack, and several of the exotic small-plates dishes are served on blocks of black slate.

I liked most of the things I tasted, although the modest-size menu tends to work better in the loud room as a series of small-plate tastes (and drinks), instead of a full-bore sit-down dinner. Get the fried olives, the excellent “teardrop” kibbeh (with a pot of preserved-lemon sauce for dipping), and anything to do with vegetables, in ­particular the grilled baby artichokes (with pistachio yogurt) and the “Everyday ­Cauliflower,” served with a peanut-flavored tahini. Some of the more ambitious, entrée-style dishes (dorade with too much harissa, a decorative but overcooked baby Poussin flavored with pomegranate) don’t cohere quite as well, so stick to classics like minute steak (delicately sliced, with frizzled onions) or beef-cheek tagine, and save room for the hard-topped crème brûlée, which is served with melting shreds of halvah.

Recommended Dishes

Japanese eggplant, $11; grilled baby artichokes with pistachio dukkah, $12; poussin with crispy rice, $31

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