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Home > Restaurants > Benoit

Benoit

60 W. 55th St., New York, NY 10019 40.762439 -73.976864
nr. Sixth Ave.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
646-943-7373 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Bistro, French
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    6 out of 10

      |  

    4 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Melissa Hom

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Official Website

benoitny.com

Hours

Mon-Sat, 11:45am-11pm; Sun, 11:30am-11pm

Nearby Subway Stops

F at 57th St.; N, Q, R at 57th St.-Seventh Ave.

Prices

$19 to $48

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Bar Scene
  • Brunch - Weekend
  • Business Lunch
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Hot Spot
  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef
  • Notable Wine List
  • Private Dining/Party Space
  • Prix-Fixe
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

When Alain Ducasse’s casual bistro-brasserie outlet Benoit opened in 2008 in Jean-Jacques Rachou’s old Le Côte Basque space on 55th Street, the city’s dwindling number of French snobs (okay, basically just this French snob) were scandalized by the slimy, rock-hard quenelles, the overcooked, overpriced chicken, and the grim, watery quality of the onion soup. But in late 2009, Ducasse installed Martha Stewart’s former private chef, Pierre Schaedelin, in the kitchen. The tiny, darkened barroom of the restaurant still has an unfortunate flat-screen TV flickering in the corner, the cramped dining-room layout means the tables are still too close together, and on crowded evenings the harried waiters occasionally crash into each other. But Schaedelin—who has also worked for two Ducasse restaurants in Europe and been the executive chef at Le Cirque—revamped and expanded the classic brasserie menu, instilling it with some much-needed professional zip. Now, the menu is carried out by chef Philippe Bertineau.

The quenelles de brochet ($22, in a dreckish, rust-colored Nantua sauce) remain distressingly rubbery (“Maybe they’re supposed to be that way,” offered Mrs. Platt brightly), but the onion soup has a bubbly, agreeably thick gratinéed top, and Schaedelin’s signature tarte flambée is worth a special trip. The salmon en croûte was as big as a toaster (that’s too big), and the fresh, hand-chopped beef tartare seemed slightly oversauced. But the boudin aux pommes has a nice, crisp snap to it, and other stately old delicacies (steak au poivre with Brussels sprouts, duck à l’orange without too much orange) were well received by our little group of Francophiles. The thing to get on a cold, early spring afternoon, however, is Schaedelin’s faithful rendition of Rachou’s legendary cassoulet. It’s made with tarbais beans and faintly caramelized hunks of pork belly and country sausage, and is so filling that when dessert rolls around, you’ll only need a taste of the excessively large tarte Tatin ($24 for two) or the famous Ducasse baba au rhum, which is as rich, decorative, and exquisitely boozy as ever.

Bar

The bar area is open daily from noon to midnight.

Lunch Special
The three-course $21 lunchtime prix fixe is one of the better deals in midtown.

Ideal Meal

Tarte flambée, $12; cassoulet, $29

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