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Home > Restaurants > Bistro de la Gare

Bistro de la Gare

626 Hudson St., New York, NY 10014 40.73827 -74.005296
nr. Jane St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-242-4420 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Bistro, French, Italian
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    9 out of 10

      |  

    4 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Matt Dutile

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Official Website

bistrodelagarenyc.com

Nearby Subway Stops

A, C, E at 14th St.

Prices

$21-$28

Payment Methods

American Express, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Brunch - Weekend
  • Business Lunch
  • Outdoor Dining
  • Prix-Fixe
  • Romantic

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

This venue is closed.

For a certain subset of wistful, French-leaning gourmands, bistro remains one of the most durable, comforting words in the restaurant language. It conjures images of convivial carriage-house quarters with steamy windowpanes and country stews cooked in tiny backroom kitchens. At a spare little space down on Hudson Street, two seasonedand, I’m guessing, slightly wistfulrestaurant veterans, Maryann Terillo (formerly of Jarnac) and Elisa Sarno (formerly of Babbo), are attempting to re-create this old world once again. They call their restaurant Bistro de la Gare, after Terillo’s vanished West Village café where they worked together in the eighties. Their narrow railroad space has fifteen tables and a five-seat bar where you can chill bottles of wine brought in from the liquor store around the corner). There are familiar, earthy preparations on the menu, like duck rillettes, and an appropriately bulky cassoulet served in an earthen crock as heavy and round as a cannonball.

We’ve seen this show many times before, of course, and like a classic, old opera, its pleasure isn’t in the content necessarily. It is in the neighborly scale, the ritualized pace of the proceedings, and, if you’re lucky, the modest price of the show. This bistro (the menu’s stated theme is Mediterranean, which means a French-bistro format mingled with hints of Italy) isn’t exactly cheap, however. On one of my early visits, $9 bought a small tuft of mesclun salad, and for $3 more you could get a smattering of seafood (mussels, ribbons of squid, a shrimp or two) thrown into a tangle of frisée. The duck rillettes ($10) come in a thimble-size cup but are redeemed by their unctuous, country- style flavor. So were the fat, fresh scallops ($14 for two), which the kitchen sears, then tosses with sherry vinegar and shreds of black garlic, and perches atop a little mountain of fava beans.

The dishes on the entrée list are fairly ambitious for a fifteen-table joint, and the best of them tend to be more Italian than French. The gnocchi alla Romana, with Tuscan kale and grilled hedgehog and white-trumpet mushrooms, has a refreshingly unformed, home-style quality to it, as does the Greenmarket lasagne, which is constructed with plenty of gooey béchamel and Parmesan and sheets of paper-thin house-rolled pasta. On the other hand, the sautéed skate delivered to our table had a bedraggled, grayish tinge to it, and the crispy rabbit was muffled in a generic, overbreaded crust. My cassoulet was thick and sturdy enough to feed an army of ravenous peasants, but most of its crucial elements (sausage, pork cheeks, duck confit) were overcooked. If you’re in the mood for a proper country feed, order the robust interpretation of chicken cacciatore instead, which is tossed with mushrooms and bits of salty pancetta and poured over a smooth mass of polenta.

Bistro de la Gare was filled with a friendly buzz on the evenings I dropped in; as is the custom with a certain kind of old-fashioned restaurant, the proprietors emerged from the kitchen to commune with their patrons and, on occasion, even clear their plates. Small kitchens have a habit of ignoring dessert, but that’s not the case here. Eight dollars buys a thick wedge of flourless chocolate cake (with a spoonful of crème fraîche on the side); an affogato made with vanilla ice cream and a generous splash of espresso; or a healthy serving of bread pudding, torn up in a white porcelain bowl and covered with crème anglaise. For $1 more you can get a round of chocolate budino pudding, garnished with a scoop of odd but palatable goat-cheese ice cream; or an elegant panna cotta, dressed with crushed walnuts and a film of white-wine syrup, that quivers delicately when you tweak it with your spoon.

Ideal Meal

Scallops, chicken cacciatore, panna cotta.

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