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Bunk

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

740 Driggs Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11211 40.712669 -73.960794
nr. S. 2nd St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
347-763-0434 Send to Phone

  • Cuisine: Soup & Sandwich
  • Price Range: $$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: ***

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Photo by Tirzah Brott

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Official Website

bunksandwiches.com

Nearby Subway Stops

J, M, Z at Marcy Ave.; L at Bedford Ave.

Prices

$5-$12

Payment Methods

American Express, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Breakfast
  • Lunch
  • Take-Out
  • Reservations Not Required

Alcohol

  • Beer and Wine Only

Reservations

Not Accepted

Profile

This venue is closed.

The bathroom-wall photo of a wolfish ’50s-era Elvis gobbling a sandwich tells you everything you need to know about Bunk. Bunk is all about indulging appetites. And Bunk is all about the glory that is the sandwich. Two ideas, incidentally, that pretty much sum up the philosophy of the Underground Gourmet. The counter-service sandwich shop that opened recently in Williamsburg is a branch of a popular Portland, Oregon, mini-chain run by a crew of musician-cooks including co-founder Tommy Habetz, who once worked for Mario Batali as a Lupa sous-chef.

For his first Bunk foray outside Portland, Habetz hired Jake Adams, a former Milk Bar chef de cuisine, to oversee the kitchen. The sandwich-making modus operandi here is to start with the classics, then by judicious tweaking, scratch cooking, meticulous construction, and the use of outstanding bread and top-notch ingredients, improve upon them. This formula works like a charm. Take, for instance, the Cubano which crams pork belly, pork butt, good New Hampshire ham, Swiss cheese, and pickles into a crackly, well-smooshed roll, its innards swiped with mustard and drizzled with hot sauce. This substantial specimen is rich and tangy but streamlined enough to evoke the kind of sandwich you might find in an old-school Cuban luncheonette on Roosevelt Avenue. The fried-egg-and-cheese on a toasted poppy-seed Kaiser roll also deftly bridges the gap between crowd-pleasing classic and gourmet upgrade. It comes with sharp Oregon Cheddar and an optional choice of bacon, ham, or housemade pork sausage. Get the sausage, and for an umami sensation like no other, do as they do at the original Bunk and order it with add-on anchovies. (A note on the Kaiser rolls: They’re specially made for Bunk by Bien Cuit’s Zachary Golper and they’re terrific almost as dense and tight-crumbed as a bagel but with a mysteriously easy chew.)

As for the rest of the impressive roster, the roast-chicken salad with bacon and avocado is a contender. The meatball hero is spot-on. The tuna melt is un-mayo’d in favor of oil and balsamic, plus mustard and pickles, and tasty as can be. And an Italian combo that brings together ham, three cured meats from Oregon’s excellent Olympia Provisions, and a Mazzola hero roll could go up against any East Coast hoagie. If there’s an underperformer in the bunch, it’s the grilled Cheddar, undone by pain de mie sliced so thick it’s proportionately out of whack with the relatively spare amount of cheese.

Bunk could easily get away with serving just its signature sandwiches and the bags of Kettle chips that come with them, but the kitchen also turns out some great side dishes. Chief among these are burnt broccoli with garlic and chiles, a spectacular potato salad (credit the addition of bacon and eggs), and fries smothered with New Orleans-style debris gravy that puts the disco-fries competition to shame. For dessert, try a chocolate-chip cookie. After all, they’re baked by the guy who used to help run Milk Bar.

Ideal Meal

Pork-belly cubano, debris fries.

Related Stories

Featured In
The Underground Gourmet: Bunk and Southside Coffee Enter New York’s Sandwich Pantheon  (12/06/15)

 

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