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Chinatown Brasserie

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

380 Lafayette St., New York, NY 10003 40.727531 -73.993481
nr. Great Jones St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-533-7000 Send to Phone

    Reserve a Table | Order Online

  • Cuisine: Chinese
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

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    • Generally Excellent
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    • Good
    Cheap Eats
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  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    7 out of 10

      |  

    13 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Kira Pollack

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Official Website

chinatownbrasserie.com

Nearby Subway Stops

6 at Bleecker St.; N, R at 8th St.-NYU

Prices

$14-$36

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Hot Spot
  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef
  • Private Dining/Party Space
  • Design Standout
  • Teen Appeal
  • Catering

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Delivery

Profile

This venue is closed.

The proprietors use the term brasserie to convey a sense of casual, swank familiarity. The name is designed to evoke memories of old American Chinatown with its familiar specialties (good though curiously un-crispy crispy orange beef, ordinary spare ribs, pleasingly steamy piles of shrimp fried rice). But if you’ve been dining out around town over the last few years, you've seen this kind of place before. Chinatown Brasserie is yet another large, theatrical, Asian-themed dining palace, a place where the mostly Western waitstaff are made to squeeze into black ninjalike outfits and mini Suzie Wong costumes, where the $12 cocktails tend to be sweet and highly colored, and where you can party until the wee hours in a dimly lit subterranean bar space decked out with large and impressively intricate landscape sculptures imported from China and an actual pond, filled with lily pads and a school of picturesque and gently gliding koi.

These props, which reportedly cost $6 million, might have made an impression five years ago, but compared with the grandiose, Godzilla-size dining establishments of today (Buddakan, Megu, Morimoto), they barely register. If you’re looking for a decent approximation of a certain kind of American Chinese meal, however, you could do an awful lot worse. The restaurant serves an impressive selection of dim sum, concocted by a Hong Kong-born dim-sum chef named Joe Ng. The ones I liked best involved shrimp, particularly the yellow, triangular shrimp-and-snow-pea-leaf dumplings, and the little pouches of translucent rice-paper skin stuffed with shrimp and Chinese chives. My wonton-addicted daughters considered the wonton soup to be excellent, as was the very un-Chinese grilled-beef salad, loaded with refreshing amounts of basil and mint.

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