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Cut

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Four Seasons Hotel New York Downtown
99 Church St., New York, NY 10007 40.712803 -74.009065
at Barclay St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
646-880-1995 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Steakhouse
  • Price Range: $$$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

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    • Good
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    • Moderate
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Official Website

fourseasons.com

Hours

Sun-Thu, 7am-10pm; Fri-Sat, 7am-11pm

Nearby Subway Stops

2, 3 at Park Pl.

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Breakfast
  • Brunch - Daily
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Accepted/Not Necessary

Profile

If you have money to burn in this increasingly stratified dining town, there are plenty of interesting, occasionally even worthy places to drop a bundle of cash at, starting as usual with that traditional showplace for big-money gourmands everywhere: the steakhouse. I feel like I’m in the oligarch section of my favorite Moscow restaurant, said one of my worldly friends as we surveyed the legions of grinning, pink-cheeked Wall Street sugar daddies who populate the dark-toned dining room at the newly opened Gotham branch of Wolfgang Puck’s upmarket steakhouse chain, Cut, off the lobby of the Four Seasons Hotel near ground zero. Six of the Bourdeaux on the old-fashioned, high-roller wine list cost over $2,000, and one of them (the $6,255 ’82 Lafite Rothschild) costs more than three times that, so if you’re wise, you’ll spend your dwindling expense account on the varied selection of beefsteaks, like grass-fed filet from FingerLakes Farms upstate, an impressive selection of fatty cuts of wagyu from Japan’s Miyazaki prefecture, and a professionally charred 20-ounce rib eye from Creekstone Farms, which, at $59, is not so absurdly priced by the vertiginous standards of this steak-mad town.

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