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Home > Restaurants > Desmond’s

Desmond’s

153 E 60th St., New York, NY 10065 40.762816 -73.967049
nr. Lexington Ave.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-207-4949 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: American Nouveau
  • Price Range: $$$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    8 out of 10

      |  

    5 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Wendy Goodman

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Official Website

desmondsny.com

Nearby Subway Stops

4, 5, 6 at 59th St.

Prices

$22 to $34

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Dine at the Bar
  • Good for Groups
  • Lunch
  • Open Kitchens / Watch the Chef
  • Take-Out

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

This venue is closed.

Desmond’s, which opened for business a month or so ago on a gloomy stretch of 60th Street, across from the loading dock at Bloomingdale’s, aspires to be the kind of restaurant that your sophisticated grandmother used to enjoy on her stately forays into the big city. The tables in the high-ceilinged former carriage-house space are covered with white linen and decorated with little silver lamps shaped like pineapples. The waiters are dressed in suitably subdued tones of white and charcoal gray, and several of them speak with comforting (if slightly indistinct) Continental accents. There’s a version of Waldorf salad on the menu (tossed with sliced Concord grapes, the way your grandmother used to like it) and a passable Dover sole. If you’re in the mood for a stout pretheater Edwardian feast, you can even dine on a beef Wellington big enough to feed a party of six.

Desmond’s proprietors (Indochine veteran John Loeffler, former Soho House London cook David Hart, and Richard O’Hagan from London’s Annabel’s) appear to be aiming for something like a latter-day Stork Club atmosphere. But the restaurant’s timeless, slightly archaic charms are diminished somewhat by the acoustics in the echoey room (after it was a carriage house, it was a bank), not to mention the lighting, which is catacomb-gray in the afternoons and tomblike in the evenings. Then there’s the location, next to the back end of Bloomingdale’s. The spot might be convenient for a quick ­after-work drink or a nice shopping lunch in midtown, but it’s beset by a steady stream of traffic during the day and strewn with garbage bags from local fast-food joints (a pizza parlor next door, a Subway sandwich franchise down the street) at night.

Not that my slightly shell-shocked out-of-town cousins had anything bad to say about their midtown lunch, which began, the way so many such luncheons do, with a Cobb salad (here with chunks of fresh lobster) and a perfectly acceptable tuna tartare dressed with bits of ginger. A soft block of pork belly, with an apple salad and a salty-sweet caramel sauce, is also available as an appetizer, along with scrambled eggs, that other ageless grandmother favorite, which were served to us, in the mostly deserted dining room, on a thin blanket of smoked salmon with a spoonful of caviar on top. The cheese soufflé I ordered one evening was less a soufflé than a wizened little cheese tart (ringed, in a wan British way, with pickled beets), although the risottos I sampled (one folded with crab for the exorbitant price of $29, the other with spring vegetables) were decent renditions of that deceptively tricky dish.

Decent is as good an adjective as any to describe most of the food at this inoffensive, slightly pricey new midtown restaurant. You can obtain a decent lobster (char-grilled, with drawn butter and crunchy French fries) and a decent salmon fillet, plated with lettuce and a curry vinaigrette. The Dover sole was muffled in a dreary shrimp-flavored butter sauce the evening I tried it, but if you’re in the mood for meat, there’s decent filet mignon on the menu (with ­Béarnaise sauce and cracked marrow bones) and excellent grilled lamb chops, served uncut on a butcher’s board. The desserts include a salted chocolate tart with a scoop of malt ice cream, a rhubarb crumble with lemon-verbena ice cream, and a delicate version of that old midtown classic Black Forest cake, flavored with cherries.

Ideal Meal

Scrambled eggs with caviar, lamb chops, Black Forest cake.

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