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Flatbush Farm

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

76 St. Marks Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11217 40.679692 -73.974227
nr. Sixth Ave.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
718-622-3276 Send to Phone

  • Cuisine: American Traditional
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
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  • Reader Rating:

    8 out of 10

      |  

    13 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Dave Ratzlow

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Official Website

flatbushfarm.com

Hours

Mon-Thu, 11:30am-3pm and 5:30pm-11pm; Fri, 11:30am-3pm and 5:30pm-midnight; Sat, 10:30am-3pm and 5:30pm-midnight; Sun, 10:30am-3pm and 5:30pm-11pm

Nearby Subway Stops

2, 3 at Bergen St.; B, Q at Seventh Ave.

Prices

$14-$24

Payment Methods

MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Brunch - Weekend
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Lunch
  • Outdoor Dining
  • Take-Out
  • Reservations Not Required

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Not Accepted

Profile

With the possible exception of the Bay Area, Brooklyn may be the world epicenter of so-called local, seasonal, and—in the prevailing menu-speak—"organic whenever possible" cooking. In the past, it's been enough to cite farm sources (360, Franny's) or host farmer dinners (Applewood). Now, Kings County Haute Barnyard restaurants are confusing matters by naming themselves as if they were, in fact, produce-purveying competition for the Park Slope Coop. First came the Farm on Adderley, in Ditmas Park, and now there's Flatbush Farm, a bar and restaurant in the old Bistro St. Mark's space that started by serving small plates before launching its dining-room menu. The restaurant has the right rural connections: Satur Farms on the North Fork supplies the restaurant with locally grown produce. Aside from a few artfully displayed farm implements and staid portraits, the long, high-ceilinged space is more urban chic than country quaint; paper napkins and juice glasses for wine are the most notable signs of the restaurant's commitment to the Simple Life. But Lind's menu lives up to its rustic promise with hearty dishes like spaetzle with mushroom ragout and lamb shoulder with bubble and squeak. One night's pork goulash was a tough, chewy disappointment, but the special salmon-cake appetizer was a textural triumph, moist and meaty over a bed of leeks and grainy mustard. One of those and a Pinkus Organic Ur Pils in the Indian-summer-worthy garden is about as bucolic as Brooklyn gets.

Note

Reservations are accepted only for parties of six or more.

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