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Home > Restaurants > Ghenet Brooklyn

Ghenet Brooklyn

348 Douglass St., Brooklyn, NY 11217 40.679157 -73.981579
nr. Fourth Ave.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
718-230-4475 Send to Phone

  • Cuisine: African/Moroccan
  • Price Range: $$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: ****

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating:

    7 out of 10

      |  

    3 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Dave Ratzlow

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Official Website

ghenet.com

Hours

Mon, 5pm-10pm; Tue-Thu, 5pm-10:30pm; Fri, 5pm-11pm; Sat, noon-11pm; Sun, noon-10pm

Nearby Subway Stops

R at Union St.

Prices

$13-$18

Payment Methods

MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Good for Groups
  • Take-Out

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Not Accepted

Profile

Mother-daughter duo Yeworkwoha Ephrem and Sosinna Degefu opened the popular Nolita Ethiopian spot Ghenet in 1998, and ten years later, they've brought their spicy fare to Brooklyn. The honey-lit Park Slope outpost, with low, dark-wood tables flanked by caramel-hued banquettes, invites groups to graze in Ethiopian fashion from large circular platters. “At the start of the meal, we say ‘enibla’ – let’s eat together,” explains Degefu. Tangy, spongy injera bread, made from the African grain teff, replaces utensils and arrives like a row of tan, folded napkins. The country’s cuisine is generally more peppery than its neighboring cousins, and the injera serves as a pliant spice-absorber for lip-tingling dishes like mesir wett, lentils slow-bubbled in a berbere sauce of red chili peppers and garlic. Milder is the doro aletcha, tender chicken legs and a whole boiled egg enveloped in sweet onions. Innovative appetizers, like rosy chunks of tuna tartar wrapped in toasted injera, show off the kitchen’s modernizing prowess. The warm space suggests an earthy hut, with a straw ceiling, a rough-hewn front door with a carved-walking-cane (which belonged to Degefu’s father) handle; and a soundtrack of throaty Ethiopian singing.

Recommended Dishes

Asir tiklil, $9; doro aletcha, $14; mesir wett, $13

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