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Hot Kitchen

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

104 Second Ave., New York, NY 10003 40.727416 -73.988156
nr. 6th St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-228-3090 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Chinese
  • Price Range: $$

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Photo by Hannah Mattix

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Official Website

hotkitchenny.com

Hours

Mon-Thu, noon-11:30pm; Fri-Sat, noon-midnight; Sun, noon-10:30pm

Nearby Subway Stops

6 at Astor Pl.

Prices

$5-$19

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Delivery
  • Lunch
  • Take-Out

Alcohol

  • Beer and Wine Only

Reservations

Accepted/Not Necessary

Delivery

Profile

It's strange to find the sort of authentic Sichuan restaurant that usually requires trekking to Queens (or at least the right block of midtown) in the student-friendly East Village. Yet here's Hot Kitchen, bright and clean, with cordial-enough (if rather slow) service, jammed with Chinese families digging into communal chile-laced dishes that make liberal use of tingly Sichuan peppercorn. Start with preserved meat dumplings, which are juicy and pack a more nuanced meaty flavor than the usual steamed dumpling. Hot and sour sweet potato noodles are a must-order: glassy vermicelli in a mouth-numbing, deeply savory broth that seems to brim with curative properties. While chicken wings won't be the best you've ever tasted, they're worth trying for the elaborate (Hunan-leaning) bed of potatoes, mushrooms, lotus, and chopped chiles they're arrayed on, like some sort of spice fiend's Thanksgiving redux. Dry-fried and crunchy Mei Shan beef, with its sweet-and-spicy notes, should appeal to American-Chinese aficionados and hard-core regional-cuisine nerds alike. Skip the village spicy chicken, which, if ordered boneless, arrives chopped and flavorless on a bed of bell peppers. Prices are a bit higher than what you find in Flushing, but the shorter subway trip makes up for it.

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