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Home > Restaurants > Koi Soho

Koi Soho

246 Spring St., New York, NY 10013 40.725459 -74.005488
at Varick St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-842-4550 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Japanese/Sushi
  • Price Range: $$$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
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    • Good
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  • Reader Rating:

    7 out of 10

      |  

    1 Reviews | Write a Review

Photo by Liz Clayman

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Official Website

koirestaurant.com

Hours

Mon-Wed, noon-2:30pm and 6pm-11pm; Thu-Fri, noon-2:30pm and 6pm-11:30pm, Sat, 6pm-11:30pm; Sun, 6pm-10pm

Nearby Subway Stops

C, E at Spring St.

Prices

$20-$48

Payment Methods

American Express, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Business Lunch
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Lunch
  • Private Dining/Party Space
  • Take-Out
  • Catering
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

This L.A.-based sushi chain seems tailor-made to play backdrop to some reality show mayhem—Real Housewives slap-fight anyone?—which makes it a perfect fit for Trump Soho, where it opened its fifth location in fall 2012. This is a restaurant for people who are looking to eat a brand more than a spicy tuna roll, but with that in mind, it’s important to know that there is a spicy tuna roll on the menu, and it’s delicious. Koi is well known for its signature dishes (like its Koi Crispy Rice—clusters of sweet, fried rice topped with tartare), and while these do not disappoint, the real star on the menu seems to be the miso cod. The sushi is respectably portioned (and priced), and there’s a Kobe beef “style” filet mignon. The designers have opted for the traditional New Sushi Restaurant aesthetic: gray paint on the walls, dim lighting, the occasional glistening surface, discreet plant life, and a black stone bar. But for all their efforts (and in some cases, like with the garish, pearlescent menus, because of them) they’re unable to disguise the fact that you are eating in a hotel lobby—albeit an expensive one.

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