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Home > Restaurants > Little Park

Little Park

Smyth
85 West Broadway, New York, NY 10007 40.715169 -74.009456
nr. Chambers St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-220-4110 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: American Nouveau
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
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    • Good
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    • Delicious
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  • Critics' Rating: ***

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Photo by Carolyn Griffin

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Official Website

littlepark.com

Hours

Mon-Fri, 7am-11am, 11:30am-3pm, and 5:30pm-11pm; Sat-Sun, 7am-3pm and 5:30pm-11pm

Nearby Subway Stops

1, 2, 3 at Chambers St.; A, C at Chambers St.

Prices

$15-$24

Payment Methods

American Express, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Breakfast
  • Brunch - Weekend
  • Dine at the Bar
  • Hot Spot
  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef
  • Private Dining/Party Space
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Profile

Few New York chefs have been as adept as Andrew Carmellini at synthesizing fashionable trends and translating them quickly into crowd-pleasing restaurants. With the exception of what our server described as a healthy obsession with “the seasonal and the vegetal,” however, Little Park, appears to be refreshingly trend-free. The room, off the lobby of the Smyth hotel in lower Tribeca (sadly, that’s a trend), is decorated in blondish, woodsy tones, like at a popular restaurant in the hills around San Diego or L.A. The menu is simple and uncluttered, and the prices are unnervingly reasonable. There are no “to share” platters of pork belly or roast chicken for two (though there is kale), but you can get a decent burger at Carmellini’s Evening Bar across the lobby.

Little Park isn’t an overtly trendy French bistro (like Carmellini’s Lafayette), in other words, or a rowdy pasta bar (like Bar Primi), or a neo-Brooklynesque hipster joint (the Dutch). But as one polished little dish succeeds the next, the sense you get is that, with all these popular trends covered, this talented chef is taking the time, at long last, to cook for himself. The first things we tasted were some plum-sweet scallops from Peconic Bay, which are served in their fan-shaped shells atop a mound of crushed ice and dressed with shavings of apple. They were followed by rows of fresh fluke crudo (also from the local waters off Long Island) brightened with a crunchy relish of scallions and peppers, and a wheel of beetroot tartare leavened with toasted rye crumbs and a dappling of smoked trout roe, which was so satisfying that I ended up ordering it twice.

There are more than a few recipes like this on the menu at Little Park, and, to the shock of the unrepentant carnivores at my table, many tend to involve vegetables. I’m thinking of slices of salty-sweet butternut squash molded with a melting scrim of burrata cheese, and little heaps of Brussels-sprout leaves, which Carmellini and his chefs crisp around the edges and toss with pickled currants, more bread crumbs, dabs of smoked-parsnip purée, and a balancing splash of apple-cider vinaigrette. Kale, when it makes its inevitable appearance, is sautéed and stuffed into buttery oblong ravioli. You can enjoy these vegetal treats with bowls of well-executed risotto tinged purple with more beetroot and dusted with poppy seeds, tangles of whole-wheat spaghetti spooned with a rich pork ragù, and earthy, faintly burnt sunchokes that taste a little like a soft, comfort-food version of black truffles.

The kitchen could easily grind down over time under the weight of lunch and breakfast services, an ambitious bar menu, and the endless hamster wheel of room-service obligations. But you’d be hard-pressed to find a more delectably crisped duck dish in town (the pink slices are plated with red quinoa and crushed turnips), or a more inventive iteration of that old warhorse lobster in the shell, which is grilled, spritzed with tarragon butter and lemon juice, and served over a bed of flowering chives. The desserts are comforting but executed with a gourmet touch. Try the pear tart, the tangerine-grapefruit sorbet (topped with candied kumquat), and an addictive multitextured little creation called “Frozen Lemon Fluff Honey,” which melts to a kind of tart, candied sweetness on the tip of your tongue.

Ideal Meal

Beetroot tartare, Brussels sprouts, black-kale ravioli, roast duck, Frozen Lemon Fluff Honey.

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