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Mission Cantina

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

172 Orchard St., New York, NY 10002 40.71753 -73.990256
nr. Stanton St.   See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-254-2233 Send to Phone

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  • Cuisine: Mexican
  • Price Range: $

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  • Critics' Rating: **

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review

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Official Website

missioncantinanyc.com

Hours

Daily noon to 3 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. to midnight

Nearby Subway Stops

F, J, M, Z at Delancey St.-Essex St.

Prices

Appetizers, $5-$11; tacos and large plates, $5.50-$32.50.

Special Features

  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef
  • Take-Out
  • Delivery after 10pm

Alcohol

  • Beer and Wine Only

Delivery

Profile

Even those of us churls who haven’t been entirely enamored with Danny Bowien’s aggressive, two-fisted brand of cooking have to admit that the San Francisco chef has a gift for imbuing his restaurants with a cockeyed party spirit. Before Mission Chinese was shuttered by city authorities for a list of infractions (too many mice being the main one), the lines outside the ramshackle room spread, famously, down the block. At Bowien’s latest Orchard Street venture, Mission Cantina, the lines aren’t as long, but chances are you’ll encounter an enthusiastic scrum of eaters by the door, waiting for tables to clear. Like the other Mission space, this one is decorated with festive cultural artifacts (piñatas, fluttering hand-cut squares of paper). The music is infectiously loud; the lighting has a kaleidoscopic, pastel quality to it; and the tables are nudged close together, like in a popular nightclub.

But unlike the Mission operation down the street (which may reopen in a different location), Bowien’s new, Mexican-themed establishment has a refreshing air of permanence about it. The room occupies a prominent corner space on Stanton and Orchard and features tall, sturdy glass windows on two sides. The state-of-the-art kitchen is aboveground, and partially covered with glass, so you can watch cooks stamp out their yellow-corn masa tacos the way you’d watch a DJ spin records. Unlike the settled, intricate canon of Sichuan cuisine, the casual, taco-heavy menu seems to lend itself more naturally to the kind of hefty nose-to-tail experiments Bowien and his cooks specialize in, and almost everything on it looks like it might be really good to eat.

Like at Mission Chinese, the dish that sets the tone for the proceedings is a simple plate of chicken wings. Instead of being bombed into oblivion with a one-note blizzard of tingly hot pepper, however, these wings are tossed in an elegant mix of cumin and cinnamon, among other spices, and dripped with a well-≠balanced combination of crema, tangy house-made chile vinegar, and cotija cheese. You can enjoy them with bowls of fresh guacamole (to be scooped with curling squares of chicharrónes, or crinkly, lobster-colored shrimp chips) and a selection of cooling, elegantly composed ceviches, which the kitchen might make with shrimp and butterfish; squares of arctic char spritzed with lime, coconut milk, and salmon roe; or fat, spicy-sweet scallops folded, in classic Bowien fashion, with green olives and a delicate chopping of raw beef heart.

Beef hearts don’t make an appearance on Mission Cantina’s impressive taco roster (I counted 14), although beef tongue does (with an interesting topping of pickled tomatoes and fried peanuts), and so does beef tripe (paired, less interestingly, with shrimp). Neither of these combinations was quite as successful as the lamb shoulder, which is sweetened with smoked prunes, or the skate wing I ordered one evening, encased in tempura batter and paired with soft slices of avocado. Not surprisingly, however, the most successful dishes of all at this boisterous establishment tend to be the large, party-size platters, in particular the lamb ribs (steamed by the rack in banana leaves), and Bowien’s fried chicken, which is encrusted in a lightly crisp batter, drizzled with chile vinegar and spoonfuls of honey, and served with a stack of hot tortillas on the side.

Recommended Dishes

Chicken wings; house ceviches; lamb with smoked prune and/or skate-wing tacos; fried chicken.

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