Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Home > Restaurants > Momofuku Nishi

Momofuku Nishi

232 Eighth Ave., New York, NY 10011 40.744349 -73.998808
nr. 22nd St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
646-518-1919 Send to Phone

    Reserve a Table | Order Online

  • Cuisine: Italian
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Critics' Rating: *

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Photo by Melissa Hom

Share this listing

Official Website

nishi.momofuku.com

Hours

Daily, noon-3pm, 5:30pm-11pm

Nearby Subway Stops

C, E at 23rd St.; 1 at 23rd St.

Prices

$22-$40

Payment Methods

American Express, Discover, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Dine at the Bar
  • Lunch
  • Notable Chef
  • Reservations Not Required
  • Online Reservation

Alcohol

  • Full Bar

Reservations

Recommended

Delivery

Profile

Now that David Chang’s Momofuku is an international restaurant empire, there’s a question of what, exactly, a “Momofuku” restaurant really is. What does the name mean to diners, and how does that translate to the food and the space? It’s an issue that’s plagued Chelsea’s Momofuku Nishi since it opened at the beginning of 2016. The space has seen a series of identity shifts over the first 20 months since it opened, and that was before Chang and chef Joshua Pinsky closed to overhaul the restaurant and start over. It’s now Momofuku’s first Italian, with — get ready for it — very un-Momofuku-like cushioned seats and comfortable banquettes. The menu of dishes includes orecchiette with octopus and broccoli rabe, chitarra spaghetti with “duck-leg agrodolce,” and fried lobster fra diavolo with chile spaghettoni. Whether this approach will work — and appeal to the neighborhood’s diners — is still an open question. Even with Momofuku’s massive following, it’s tricky to pull off a restaurant redo and shift the public narrative.

Related Stories

Adam Platt’s Where to Eat 2017  (12/26/16)
New York Magazine Review
Adam Platt’s Full Review  (03/21/16)

Advertising
Advertising